Klopper

Whoppers,

what Spiegel.de called the two World-Cup Snowden revelations in its “Eleven Things That Happened While You Were Watching Soccer” article:

  • That most of the Americans whose communications data have been collected by the N.S.A. were not suspects.
  • That the N.S.A. etc. have been suspecting Muslim Americans just because they’re Muslim.

(KLOPP ah.)

“Wer Grundrechte einschränkt, ist beweispflichtig.”

“Anyone limiting fundamental rights must provide proof.”

From former federal data protection officer Peter Schaar’s blog post just before the European Court of Justice announced its groundbreaking, wonderful and “remarkably clear” decision on 08 Apr 2014 overturning mandatory dragnet data surveillance because it violates fundamental human rights [Grundrechte].

“Anyone limiting fundamental rights must provide proof. They must provide evidence that the limitations to personal freedom are necessary in the predominant interest of the general public—that’s what our constitution requires. This principle also applies in the European Union, at the latest since 2009 when the E.U. Charter of Fundamental Rights became enforceable law of the Member States with the Treaty of Lisbon. This guideline’s origins go back before Lisbon. In December 2013, the attorney general at the European Court of Justice said in his vote that he was of the opinion that the guideline violated the protection of the private sphere guaranteed in Article 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights.

“The authors and proponents of the mandatory retention of communications traffic data [Vorratsdatenspeicherung] have not yet provided proof of the necessity and efficacy, to this day. But surely it would have been easy for them to provide the evidence, after eight years—if their arguments were accurate ones. It ought to have been easy to show that law enforcement had been harmed by the German Constitutional Court’s finding in 2010 that the Vorratsdatenspeicherung law was unconstitutional. Did conviction rates fall in Germany? Is Germany worse off than its neighbors who implemented Vorratsdatenspeicherung? No. Furthermore, neither the governments of the Member States nor the European Commission were able to provide conclusive proof in any other way for the necessity of Vorratsdatenspeicherung.”

(Vair   GROONED rechh tah   eye n shrenked,   issed   bev ICE flichh tichh.)

NSA-Untersuchungsausschuss

N.S.A. investigative committee of the Bundestag, which began meeting on 03 Apr 2014.

The committee’s chair is Clemens Binninger (C.D.U.), a former policeman.

It is tasking itself with investigating the involvement of German police and intelligence agencies—domestic, foreign and military—in the massive spying on people and companies that is now known to have been done by the U.S. and U.K. governments and their contractors.

Also it will now be investigating Germany’s culpability in the U.S.’s drone wars. Since the Süddeutsche Zeitung, Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) and Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) reported that the U.S. is using its Ramstein airbase inside Germany to support drone attacks in Somalia, Yemen and Pakistan, violating international law while killing hundreds of civilians, Germany’s government (C.D.U./C.S.U. + S.P.D.) can no longer pretend they don’t know this is happening.

The committee repeated that they would like Edward Snowden and other informed whistleblowers to give statements and answer questions for these Bundestag inquiries. Journalists repeated that the whole world will be watching this inquiry to see what the committee discovers and which stones they leave unturned.

Update on 09 Apr 2014: Clemens Binninger stepped down as chair of the N.S.A. investigative committee after only six days. He said he was resigning from the position because he felt people from the opposition parties were too interested in hearing from N.S.A. whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Update on 10 Jul 2014: A Spiegel article about Germans’ angry responses to spying by the U.S. mentioned that Clemens Binninger is chairing the Parlamentarisches Kontrollgremium, the secret Bundestag committee supposed to monitor Germany’s intelligence agencies.

(Enn ess ah   oon tah ZOO chh oongs OW! ss shoes.)

Ringtausch

A circular exchange.

Concept used to describe how intelligence agencies from countries in the Five Eyes alliance kindly spy on the other four countries’ populations so each can say they’re not spying on themselves. A Leftists party speaker used the term in the Bundestag discussion on the occasion of the first day of work for the Bundestag’s new N.S.A. investigation committee [NSA-Untersuchungsausschuss].

The American N.S.A. probably won’t send anyone to testify before this Bundestag committee. The eight members (six government, two opposition) will nevertheless try to find out what Germany’s intelligence agencies have been doing and witnessing, and how they’ve been cooperating. Like the U.S.A., Germany appears to have a parliamentary committee that is nominally in charge of its intelligence agencies but might be more of a powerless excuse that is not even fully informed: the Parliamentarisches Kontrollgremium.

(RINGED ow! sh.)

Sondergerichte vs. Schwurgerichte

Special courts vs. jury courts (lit. “oath courts” because jurors are sworn in).

Apparently Turkey has been under international criticism for years for using special courts [Sondergerichte] to try serious political crimes. Now Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government has announced they will be using normal Schwurgerichte [jury trials] for these crimes as well. However, the announcement comes after Mr. Erdoğan’s government made other, unhelpful changes to Turkey’s judicial system: Human Rights Watch asked Turkish President Abdullah Gül not to sign a new law passed in the second week of this month that reduced the autonomy of Turkey’s High Council of Judges and Prosecutors or H.S.Y.K., saying the law exclusively serves to increase the government’s control over that council.

The Sondergerichte/Schwurgerichte legislation package passed in the third week of this month did contain some mild improvements. In addition to eliminating special courts for trials of serious political crimes it also reduced the maximum time you can be held in Turkish prison while they’re investigating you for a crime, from 7.5 to 5 years. In future, arrest warrants and house razzias can only be executed on the basis of “concrete evidence.” Supposedly this legislation made tapping phones more difficult.

However, in the first week of this very busy February 2014, after having quickly replaced the head of Turkey’s telecommunications oversight authority, Telekomünikasyon İletişim Başkanlığı, Mr. Erdoğan passed Turkey’s now notorious new Internet surveillance and censorship law that expanded the agency’s powers to collect data about people’s internet surfing and to block web pages.

In the second week of this month, fistfighting is said to have broken out in the Turkish parliament during debate over Mr. Erdoğan’s bill to get more control over the national board of prosecutors and judges, H.S.Y.K. They passed the legislation anyway. One M.P. had to go to hospital for a broken nose.

In the third week of this very busy February, the government put forward draft legislation expanding the power of the country’s National Intelligence Organization (Milli İstihbarat Teşkilatı or M.İ.T.). It would define prison sentences of up to 12 years as punishment for publishing secret M.İ.T. documents, for example. Update on 17 Apr 2014: The parliament passed this. Prosecutors are no longer allowed to investigate M.İ.T. agents for crimes if the agents say they were on government business. M.İ.T. is to have access to all government data, to be able to listen without a court order to phone calls inside and outside Turkey, and to be given all businesses’ data about their customers if they request it.

The brief time span in which three terrible laws were created—the drastic Internet law on 06 Feb, the kneecapping of judges and prosecutors on 15 Feb, and now this latest proposal on 21 Feb announced as democratic reforms in response to outside criticism of the Ergenekon trials—cloaked the scope of these anti-democratic changes to the rest of the world.

Turkish protesters’ anger over all the bills and the trend they indicate was easily misinterpreted by outsiders as a response to the first, internet law. Attempts to mitigate or react to one of the new terrible laws interfered with attempts to prevent the next one. The winter Olympics in Russia and the historic events in Ukraine also diverted attention from Turkish politics.

Update on 11 Apr 2014: Turkey’s Constitutional Court found the reforms unconstitutional that gave Mr. Erdoğan’s justice minister sweeping powers over the H.S.Y.K. board that appoints and fires prosecutors and judges. The F.A.Z.’s article only said the court overturned parts of this reform, however.

The prime minister’s son’s foundation received donations of >72 million euros from outside Turkey and ~10 million euros from inside Turkey. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s son and daughter Bilal Erdoğan and Esra Erdoğan are members of the Türgev foundation’s management board [Vorstand]. The organization is supposed to support Turkish youth and education; the opposition C.H.P. party said it’s a corruption center where businesspeople launder bribes they have to pay to get public contracts.

(ZONE dah gr-r-r ICHH tah   vair seuss   SHVOOR gr-r-r ICHH tah.)

Internet-Ausschuss im Bundestag

Happy holidays! The Bundestag announced plans to create its own standing internet committee [ständiger Internet-Ausschuss], responsible for online issues. Though not entirely neglected, the interface between citizens and computers is not fully covered in Germany either. The Greens traditionally disliked technology, the Pirate party was trying to fix that lacuna but now seems possibly unterwandert by the German military (what was a Defense Department employee doing as party chair, one asks oneself now, post-Snowden). The new coalition has divided up online issues among a Wirrwarr of multiple ministers, some of whom oppose digital consumer protections such as network neutrality or individuals’ data privacy yet are now the designated advocates for them.

The press learned about the new Bundestag committee’s creation from Twitter.

Topics to be handled by the parliamentary committee include the expansion of broadband infrastructure, copyrights, data security.

Update on 13 Feb 2014: The Bundestag created its internet committee! It’s called Digital Agenda (dee ghee TALL   awg EN dah).

(INN tah net   OW! ss shoes   imm   BOON dess tochh.)

Null Null Sieben

The 007 license plate of the car that dropped off Chancellor Merkel at the E.U. summit on 24 Oct 2013 in Brussels, where the hot unofficial topic was outrage at revelations about U.S. spying on the German chancellor’s cell phone and in previously-unknown but huge volumes in France. Possibly also Italy, including the Vatican. And now Spain.

“Spying on your friends is not okay.” —Angela Merkel (C.D.U.)

“That would represent an entirely new quality, and cast a new light on all statements made by the N.S.A. in the past few months.” —Ronald Pofalla (C.D.U.), who as Kanzleramtschef, the chancellor’s chief of staff, is responsible for coordinating and monitoring Germany’s intelligence agencies. He had declared the scandal over last summer in response to assurances from the U.S.A.

“We will not allow ourselves to be treated like that by the Americans. The trust has been harmed. I think a few things have to happen now before this trust can be restored.” —Hans-Peter Friedrich (C.S.U.), interior minister

“The Americans are not fully aware of the situation. And then you’re told things like, ‘but everyone spies on everybody.’ And that’s where you have to say loudly and clearly: that is not okay. Friends are not allowed to eavesdrop on friends. And how would people react in America—this is what we’re saying on our visit here, how we’re describing it—if the Bundesnachrichtendienst were to spy on the U.S. president.” —Elmar Brok (C.D.U.), chair of the European Parliament committee for Foreign Affairs, currently visiting Washington D.C. to complain

“The chancellor’s cell phone is important, but the private and business communications of normal burghers is just as important. We will stand up for the protection of the basic rights of German citizens[…]” —Thomas Oppermann (S.P.D.), chair of the Bundestag’s Parlamentarisches Kontrollgremium intelligence committee that is tasked with but not always successful at monitoring and controlling Germany’s intelligence agencies. Mr. Oppermann may be hoping to become the new Justice Minister, replacing Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger (F.D.P.).

“What sort of terrorists are they trying to find in the chancellor’s cell phone? This is a really absurd indication that the reasons they’ve told us so far absolutely cannot be true.” —Christian Ströbele (Green Party), member of the Parlamentarisches Kontrollgremium intelligence committee

“It’s good that the clarification of the facts appears to be starting, now, and that at least a healthy distrust vis-à-vis the American intelligence services also appears to be arising, now.”  —Steffen Bockhahn (Leftists), member of the Parlamentarisches Kontrollgremium

“The German government now mistrusts all claims and assurances made by the U.S. government in the entire N.S.A. affair. Now that we know they bugged the chancellor’s cell phone, the U.S. government can no longer sustain its claim from last summer that it did not injure Germany’s interests. It did, and representatives of all parties agree on this, utterly deceive Germany.” —Ulrich Deppendorf, ARD studio head and news editor-in-chief

“I think we should be honest that we have the capacity to obtain information that we didn’t have before. What we need now is the appropriate legislation that ensures we are not seeking or not using the capacity that we have.” —Fredrik Reinfeldt (centrist Moderate Party), Prime Minister of Sweden. (Approximate quote; his original English was drowned out by the German translation.)

“So we have to think about what we need. What data protection agreements do we need, what transparency do we need. We stand between the United States of America and Europe, before shared challenges […]” —Angela Merkel (C.D.U.)

“When I walk into a negotiation and must fear that the other side, a friendly democracy, already knows from espionage what I want to say in that negotiation, that’s no longer eye-to-eye.” —Martin Schulz (S.P.D.), president of the European Parliament

007, might be funny if the matter weren’t so serious. […] But this isn’t just about the chancellor’s cell phone. The much bigger concern is industrial espionage, which could cost European companies billions.” –ARD correspondent Rolf-Dieter Krause

In a wonderful interview given in German on the evening of Oct. 24, E.U. commissioner Viviane Reding said she’d heard that England’s government did not want European data protection but Poland, Italy and France had joined together to fight for it. Also: “Both of us, both the Americans and the Europeans, need this Transatlantic Trade Agreement. But to be able to negotiate an agreement, you need trust. I think this trust is no longer quite as present. That’s why the first thing that must be done is to restore that trust. And then, so that Europe can speak with a single voice, for that you need strong data protection that is Europe-wide. And that has to be the basis from which we can then move into negotiations with the Americans.”

“The whole time, Frau Merkel acted as if the affair was unimportant, as if it wouldn’t impact anyone in a big way. But then when it affects her, she gets upset? When all German burghers were affected, when it was about protecting burghers’ basic rights, she didn’t do anything then.” —Anton Hofreiter (new Green party co-chair)

“It is strange: umpteen million communications from Germans alone are recorded every month by British and U.S. intelligence agencies. With these extraordinary claims from the documents supplied by the ex-N.S.A. man Edward Snowden the snooping story exploded into public view last summer, but left the German government, and one must say most Germans as well, rather strangely unmoved. Then last night a single cell phone was added to the mix—OK, it was the chancellor’s—and suddenly all hell broke loose.” —Claus Kleber, moderator at ZDF heute journal

The new Bundestag scheduled an extraordinary meeting or special session [Sondersitzung] to discuss the N.S.A. spying affair in mid-November. All political parties also agree a parliamentary inquiry [Untersuchungsausschuss] is “unavoidable.” Many parties would like to invite Edward Snowden to testify before the committee, after which he can apply for asylum in Germany.

Update on 28 Oct 2013: On Thursday, Brazil and Germany will introduce a draft United Nations resolution against N.S.A. spying. FAZ.net reported that a large majority was predicted to approve it, and that though United Nations General Assembly resolutions tend to be nonbinding, unlike Security Council resolutions, the fact that Brazil and Germany are behind this and that so many of the 193 member states support it give it extra significance. Brazilian reporter Sonia Bridi from TV Globo said Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff’s government wants the world to make international regulations for internet access and international telecommunications such that no individual state can ever again have access to the world’s key communications hubs or nodes.

Update on 26 Nov 2013: The United Nations Human Rights Committee approved Germany and Brazil’s U.N. resolution against data spying. It will be sent on to the U.N. General Assembly, where the nonbinding resolution is considered certain to pass in December 2013.

“Today, for the first time, a resolution in the United Nations expressly specified that human rights have to be protected online just as much as they must be protected offline.” –Peter Wittig, permanent representative to the U.N. for Germany since 2009

(Newel   newel   ZEEB en.)

Ohne uns nichts

“Without us, nothing.” Since the George W. Bush administration, the former U.S. phone monopoly AT&T appears to have provided cooperation in constitutionally questionable surveillance projects to such a degree that one might conclude the company thinks no one can be elected president of the U.S.A. without its support.

In addition to the famous access to a key internet node that AT&T was caught providing in San Francisco in 2002 and then granted retroactive immunity for by Congress, NYTimes.com reporting and others’ follow-ups appear to indicate AT&T has been keeping its own copies of phone communications which people have used to access e.g. a 26-year-old phone call. AT&T let government agents hire and even “embed” AT&T employees to help search the phone company’s difficult-to-use database providing access to these calls. NYTimes.com described the expensive database consultants as having to sit next to the government agents as they attempted to use the software; if this is so it makes you wonder how and if AT&T managed to keep the N.S.A. and G.C.H.Q. from having remote access to its computers.

AT&T also appears to be gradually re-acquiring the Baby Bell phone companies it was split into. Were that the case, the company might leave ~1.5 competitors in the market to avoid appearing monopolistic.

(OH neh   OONTS   NIX.)

Schwachstellen in Sicherheitsprodukte einbauen

“Building in vulnerabilities in security products,” one of several methods the N.S.A. and G.C.H.Q. used to unlock encryption methods previously thought secure, according to the Guardian.co.uk, NYTimes.com and ProPublica.org. When the Canadian company BlackBerry updated its encryption in 2009, for example, the N.S.A. cracked it in mere months, according to a Spiegel.de article headlined “Champagne!

These two large agencies and their partners in e.g. the Five Eyes alliance have also been benefiting from encryption cracking via supercomputers, targeted hacking committees, strange U.S. letters and court orders that forbid the ordered from ever mentioning the order, an N.S.A. Computer Solutions Center that “provided security testing” for tech products, subversion of international security standards used by developers but especially persuasion of tech companies, whose names remain most secret.

Tagesschau.de reported on 06 Sep 2013 that the “Bankenverband“—the name indicates an association of banks but the reporter did not define it more specifically—announced that N.S.A. employees and contractors can only view Germans’ online banking but cannot transfer money out of (“plunder”) their accounts. German consumers will not be reassured by this.

Brazil’s TV Globo on 08 Sep 2013 added to the list of snooped targets the international S.W.I.F.T. bank transfer network, the closed computer networks of “airlines, foreign governments, power companies and financial institutions” and the state-owned Brazilian oil company Petrobras, increasing fears of industrial espionage by the U.S.A. and its allies.

The Guardian.co.uk article on the targeted placement of back doors into encryption software was very angry about how vulnerable to criminals this makes everyone (called “the consumer and other adversaries” in one Snowden trove document). Weakening software causes people to commit crimes who wouldn’t normally have done so.

(Sh VOCHH shtell en   in   ZICHH ah heights prod OOK teh   EYE n bough en.)

Die Verharmloser

“The harmlessers.” Pejorative hurled in June 2013 at ruling-coalition German politicians who said the U.S.A.’s spying on domestic and international emails, phone calls, video chats, text chats and search histories, in addition to snail mail, in-house company computer networks, the ubiquitous traffic and security cameras in public spaces, and even medical, financial and toll records, is okay with them. Even if this data was used to track and kill people via extralegal drone assassination.

German media have also said the ruling coalition is “talking the N.S.A. problem small,” “veiling” and “down-moderating” it, using “placating” and “appeasing” language to angry voters, especially but not exclusively before the Bundestag election on 22 Sep 2013. Data protection officers remain unappeased, vociferously warning about these issues at their national meetings. Bundespräsident Joachim Gauck invited federal data protection officer Peter Schaar to discuss the problem and its implications at the presidential palace of Bellevue on 06 Sep 2013.

Spiegel.de reminds us the imbroglio includes tapping international fiber optic cables, forcing companies to give up their customers’ data, commissioning back doors in software and hardware advertised as secure and the N.S.A. and G.C.H.Q.’s ability to use brute computing force to break encryption. Presumably satellite communications aren’t immune either.

U.S. government intelligence agencies are also spreading this behavior around the world like an antidemocratic virus to friends, neutrals and foes alike as they share technology and illicitly-gathered information with allied intelligence agencies, pay telecoms and cable companies to codevelop snoop technology and render services and outsource much of their own sensitive work to private-sector companies. Non-allied countries will feel forced to invest in similar strategies as well. Companies are being perfectly reasonable if they decide to sell to everybody. Ignoring even light regulation sets a poor example and paves the way for disaster under bad leadership, anywhere in the world.

(Dee   feh HOM loze ah.)

Das SIGAD-Sharing

Signals intelligence activity designator sharing, i.e. data-collection-site data sharing between intelligence agencies from different countries.

Germany: Spiegel and Süddeutsche Zeitung reported that the German foreign intelligence agency, the Bundesnachrichtendienst or B.N.D., has been sharing on a massive scale communications data collected at e.g. its Bavarian Bad Aibling S.I.G.A.D. site with the U.S.A.’s National Security Agency. The data include mobile phone numbers that the B.N.D. admitted they’ve been passing on to the N.S.A. for years now supposedly under the strict condition that said phone numbers must not be used to kill people (e.g. via phone towers triangulation + drone strike); the B.N.D. also denied that it’s technologically possible to use for location purposes the G.S.M. mobile phone numbers they’ve been passing on (“G.S.M.-Mobilfunknummern sind für eine zielgenaue Lokalisierung nicht geeignet”). The German foreign intelligence agency furthermore is said to have given software it developed to the N.S.A. And the N.S.A. gave the B.N.D. its X-Keyscore software and X-Keyscore software training, including in “behavior detection.”

In an interesting parallel, the Washington Post report on 15 Aug 2013 about an audit of just a few N.S.A. branch offices which found thousands of violations of U.S. privacy rules each year also included a similarly scarcely credible excuse saying phone technology limitations were keeping the N.S.A. from snooping more: “One major problem is largely unpreventable, the audit says, because current operations rely on technology that cannot quickly determine whether a foreign mobile phone has entered the United States.”

England: The N.S.A. has apparently been paying money, such as 100 million pounds, to Britain’s G.C.H.Q., a disproportionately über-representational intelligence-gathering partner for a country of that size. The N.S.A. receives so much communications data from the U.K. that reporters said “it’s almost the same thing” whether G.C.H.Q. or the N.S.A. initially collects it.

(Doss   ZIG odd   CHER ingk.)

Verschlüsselungspflicht für Telekom-Unternehmen

“Mandatory encryption for telecom companies,” one solution proposed by the opposition to Angela Merkel’s coalition in the wake of Edward Snowden’s surveillance revelations. Another solution, discussed by the ruling coalition, was supposedly transferring responsibility for saving searchable copies of all communications from public-sector government agencies to private-sector phone companies.

Update on 02 Sep 2013: NYTimes.com reporting and others’ follow-ups appear to indicate that the company AT&T has been keeping its own copies of phone communications, more than just “metadata,” and people have used it to access 26-year-old phone calls. AT&T employees could be hired to help government agents search their difficult database.

Update dated 4 July 2013: Holland’s Data Protection Authority issued a report on their investigation into mobile network packet inspection by KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Vodafone, finding that the companies illegally saved individual customers’ online data, such as websites visited and apps used. The data was furthermore saved in a “detailed” manner.

(Fer SHLÜSS ell oongs flichh t   foor   TAY lay kom oon ter NAY men.)

Merkwürdige Umkehrung rechtsstaatlicher Logik

Remarkable reversal of rule-of-law logic.” One of Heribert Prantl’s points in his op-ed on fundamental rights [Grundrechte], the German constitution and various countries’ mass trawling to collect world communications.

“In the countries of the western world, led by the U.S.A., a remarkable process of reversal of rule-of-law logic is underway: Whether a country is ruled by law is apparently no longer measured by whether the country upholds people’s fundamental rights. Instead, the violations of fundamental rights are justified by saying it’s a rule-of-law country doing the violating. The concept of ‘rule of law’ is being stripped naked of its content and used willy-nilly despite what it actually means. The United States are justifying even the worst ominousnesses by saying ‘but we’re a Rechtsstaat (rule-of-law country).’ Apparently people think that even nobilifies waterboarding.

“…A state that views its burghers with generalized suspicion and fundamentally mistrusts everybody is not strong. A state is strong that has the security that human rights and burgher rights are the best guarantors of internal security. A democratic state, which only exists because of and from the freedom of its people, must not turn against its creators.”

(MERK voor diggah   OOM care oong   WRECKED shtot lichh err   LO! gick.)

Null-Nummer

“A nada number,” zilch, zip, zero. Opposition politicians criticized the 24-hour visit of Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich (C.S.U.) to the U.S.A. on July 12 to discuss N.S.A. spying with the Obama administration, saying Mr. Friedrich let himself be fobbed off with nonexplanations and didn’t realize the seriousness of the issues when he apparently decided to choose government rights over burgher rights. An op-ed in the Süddeutsche Zeitung said democracies can’t have freedom unless individuals in the democracies have freedom and privacy at home, and that this is a time that calls for voices and courage.

(NEWEL new mah.)

DGSE; DCRI, DNRED, DPSD, DRM, Tracfin, Service du renseignement de la Préfecture de police de Paris

The French foreign intelligence service and the six agencies with which it shares phone and computer data it bulk-collects inside and outside France. Le Monde reported on 04 Jul 2013 that there is a French equivalent to the NSA’s “Prism” program. The DGSE appears to have a huge budget: 640 million euros? in one year?

DGSE: Direction générale de la sécurité extérieure. French foreign intelligence.

DCRI: Direction centrale du renseignement intérieure. French domestic intelligence.

DNRED: Direction nationale du renseignement et des enquêtes douanières. French customs.

DPSD: Direction de la protection et de la sécurité de la défense. French military intelligence.

Tracfin: Traitement du renseignement et action contre les circuits financiers clandestins. ??? An intelligence agency that fights money laundering?

Service du reinseignement de la Préfecture de police de Paris: Paris police intelligence.

Anzeige gegen unbekannt

Criminal complaint filed against unknown persons, charge filed against “X.” The first hoovered-data German citizen complaint against persons unknown has been filed in the town of Gießen. Meanwhile, the federal prosecutors’ offices in Karlsruhe [Bundesanwaltschaft] are investigating US and UK surveillance of German data. A federal prosecutor spokeswoman confirmed they’re looking into the programs Prism, Tempora and Boundless Informant, inter alia.

(ON ts eye geh   gay gen   OON beh con t.)

Auge in Auge in Auge in Auge in Auge

“Eye to eye to eye to eye to eye,” the Five Eyes alliance of data-sharing intelligence agencies from the countries of UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

(OW! geh   in   OW! geh   in   OW! geh   in   OW! geh   in   OW! geh)

Vollzugriff und verdachtlose Überwachung

Full access and suspicionless surveillance, what whistleblower Edward Snowden said the NSA and other US intelligence organizations have. In the same Guardian.co.uk interview, Snowden also criticized the NSA’s auditing procedures as practiced.

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