Betriebsrat und Gesamtbetriebsrat befürworten

Advocating for a factory workers council and a corporation workers council.

Volkswagen’s organizational structure includes the legally-mandatory German committee of workers that is allowed a say in co-managing their workplace: the Betriebsrat. Recently the U.S.’s United Auto Workers union, quietly supported by VW management, tried to “unionize” a factory in Tennessee but was voted down by the workers themselves. U.S. media described it as a vote against union representation, while German media apparently initially reported that the workers had rejected forming a Betriebsrat. They followed up by saying the company had thought unionization was the logical first step for creating a works council at the Chattanooga factory but now they’ll just have to do it another way. “Our employees did not make a decision saying they’re against a Betriebsrat,” plant C.O.O. Frank Fischer reassured German reporters.

Had Chattanooga’s workers voted yes, they would have also gotten a seat on VW’s Gesamtbetriebsrat, apparently a workers’ council for the entire corporation consisting of employees representing VW’s ~105 locations around the world.

Since unionized U.S. auto manufacturing workers were made to seem responsible for the results of inferior car design decisions in the 1970’s, many potential employees appear to not support unions because they fear their own laziness. Fearing your own and others’ laziness seems to be part of the human condition in the U.S. but that fear isn’t as strong in Germany. It’s been interesting to me to see how Germans handle the balance of working hard, <40 hours/week, and then playing hard the rest of the time with a clear conscience, rather than coasting through a twilight lifetime of trying to live at the workplace without sufficient time off.

Süddeutsche.de and Spiegel.de both mentioned that the U.S. has a National Labor Relations Board that must still confirm the plant’s unionization vote and where objections can be filed. U.S. reporting mentioned that U.S. senators are protected under “freedom of opinion” from being sued for spreading disinformation.

(Bet REEBZ rott   oont   gez OMT bet REEBZ rott   beh FIR wort en.)

Beibehaltung

Retention.

April 2013: After it became known the chair of the supervisory board [Aufsichtsrat] of Germany’s richest and most successful soccer team, Bayern Munich, was under investigation for voluntarily reporting himself [Selbstanzeige] as having an insufficiently reported and taxed ~500 million euros in a Swiss bank account, there seem to remain some loose ends in his origin story for where the half billion came from*. Yet on 06 May 2013 Bayern Munich’s supervisory board voted not to accept Uli Hoeneß’s resignation as its head. Members of the supervisory board who supported Mr. Hoeneß at this meeting included: Herbert Hainer, C.E.O. of Adidas. Rupert Stadler, C.E.O. of Audi. Timotheus Höttges, chief of Finances and Controlling at top Bayern sponsor Deutsche Telekom. Martin Winterkorn, C.E.O. of Volkswagen. Edmund Stoiber (C.S.U.), former candidate for German chancellor in the C.D.U./C.S.U. party.

10 May 2013: Mr. Hoeneß is suing the responsible prosecutor’s office for being the source of the press’s discovery of the investigation into the mysterious half billion euros, in April 2013.

30 Jul 2013: Uli Hoeneß has been charged with alleged tax evasion. The Economic Crimes Chamber [Wirtschaftsstrafkammer] of the second Munich Landgericht [Münchener Landgericht II] must now decide whether it will allow the trial to proceed and whether to open the main trial. The decision is expected in late September 2013.

04 Aug 2013: The president of the German Soccer Association [Deutscher Fussballbund e.V., D.F.B.], Wolfgang Niersbach, declared his support for Uli Hoeneß.

07 Aug 2013: Stern.de report that an anonymous informant told the second state prosecutors office in Munich [Münchener Staatsanwaltschaft II] that Mr. Hoeneß’s untaxed millions are not limited to one account at the Swiss Vontobel bank (said by prosecutors to have contained 500 million Swiss francs but said by Mr. Hoeneß in April 2013 never to have exceeded around 15 to 20 million euros, tops). Stern.de reported the informant said Mr. Hoeneß’s Vontobel account had balances consistently [“durchgehend“] exceeding 500 million Swiss francs in years before 2008 and also supplied information about stock dealings and transactions involving numbered accounts at three other Swiss banks: Crédit Suisse, Julius Bär and the Zürcher Kantonalbank.

The whistleblower said Deutsche Telekom stock with which Mr. Hoeneß participated in so-called dividend stripping was also involved.

04 Nov 2013: Mr. Hoeneß will have to “answer before a court” after all, starting ~10 Mar 2014. Landgericht Munich II’s “Economic Chamber” [Wirtschaftskammer] announced it will allow trial of charges against him of tax evasion and providing inaccurate answers. His Selbstanzeige earlier this year “contained errors.”

Frank Bräutigam, ARD tagesschau.de’s excellent legal correspondent, said the trial will evaluate the correctness of the Selbstanzeige (timeliness, completeness and accuracy). If the court determines that the Selbstanzeige was not properly executed, next it must decide how much money was improperly handled and what penalties could be imposed.

The Bayern Munich football club’s supervisory board reconfirmed that they want to retain Mr. Hoeneß as president of the club.

14 Mar 2014: Uli Hoeneß’s trial for 3.5 million euros of tax evasion was this week. In the two weeks before the trial started on Monday, he apparently gave prosecutors 50,000, some said 70,000, pages of Vontobel bank account statements previously withheld. On Monday he surprised reporters by announcing he’d actually not paid 18 million euros tax, but this was the ultimate number, no more revelations. On Tuesday, an auditor testified that the amount was actually 27 million. He was found guilty of 28.5 million euros in tax evasion and sentenced to 3.5 years, which will probably be in an open prison. On Friday, he said he would not appeal. The prosecutors may still decide to appeal. Uli Hoeneß resigned as president of the FC Bayern Munich soccer club and chair of FC Bayern Munich Inc.’s supervisory board.

Mr. Hoeneß’s salary tended to be about 10 million euros per year. The Vontobel account never had more than 150 million euros in it at one time.

(BY beh HALT oong.)

* Mr. Hoeneß said he netted 500 million euros between 2000 and 2012 by compulsively playing the stock market starting with a 10-million-euro combination gift/loan in 2000 from a now-deceased friend, a former C.E.O. of Adidas.

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