Tag des Rocks

It looks like it means Day of RAWK, but in German it also means Day of the Skirt. On 16 May 2014, male high school students and some male teachers in northwestern France wore skirts to school to protest sexism. They looked like such nice boys in the photos in the international press.

Frankfurt’s excellent conservative business newspaper joked that jour de la jupe could be the start of a television career for the charming protesters.

The national education ministry in Paris printed posters with the movement’s logo, “Ce que soulève la jupe,” [what raises your skirt], which, said the Frankfurter Allgemeine, approximately means what questions a skirt raises! Spiegel said the movement’s motto translated as what does the skirt hide? [was verbirgt der Rock?].

Conservatives and pious homophobes did respond with outrage, saying this meant the end of the République and western civilization, Spiegel.de reported. Yes, girls and boys are equal, but if boys act like girls it will damage the boys, some declaimed. The objecters apparently ignored last year’s jour de la jupe, and Scottish rugby, but this year they’d already mobilized for unsuccessful attempts to stop gay marriage in France and saw an opportunity.

(Tochh   dess   Rocks.)

Aufenthaltsgenehmigung vs. Aufenthaltserlaubnis

“Residency permit” vs. “residency permit.”

The names of the documents that are so important for noncitizens living in a German-speaking country have changed over time and space. Some are preliminary documents acquired in order to acquire the documents you need to acquire the main permit. Some are obsolete. Some have been Swiss or Austrian, or, perhaps one day, could be an official German-language translation of an E.U. residency document.

German<>English legal dictionaries list several other names of German-language residency permits:

Aufenthaltsbefugnis, Aufenthaltsberechtigung, Aufenthaltsbewilligung, Aufenthaltsgestattung; and Aufenthaltstitel has been an umbrella term for these docs since 2005 in Germany.

An Aufenthaltsduldung [“residency toleration”] is a temporary stay of deportation.

(Ow! fenned HALL ts geh NAME ee goong   vair seuss   ow! fenned HALL ts erroll OW! b niss.)

Barbarisch, nicht gezähmt, verwildert, wildlebend, wild

Barbaric, untamed, wilding, maenadic, agrestal, rambunctious.

German’s lack of a direct equivalent for “feral” makes it hard to translate Charles Stross’s recent essay about ways spam could invade end-users’ e-libraries.

Gepflegt, an antonym for feral, is difficult to translate into English.

(Bar BAR ish,   nichh t   get SAY mt,   fer VILLED urt,   villed LAY bend,   villed.)

“Gewährung von Befreiungen und Vergünstigungen an Unternehmen, die mit Dienstleistungen auf dem Gebiet analytischer Tätigkeiten für die in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland stationierten Truppen der Vereinigten Staaten beauftragt sind”

Frontal 21 investigative reporters discovered that Germany’s governments issued permits to private-sector U.S. firms to spy on German soil at least as far back as August 2003, when the Foreign Office under Joschka Fischer (Green party) happened to create the earliest documentation found for this so far by publishing in the German Federal Gazette [Bundesgesetzblatt, BGB] some proposed amendments to what looks like a 2001 permit issued to the U.S.A.:

“Granting of exemptions and advantages to companies commissioned with services in the field of analytical activities for United States troops stationed in the Federal Republic of Germany” [Translation of the German BGB version.]

This English text from another news program might be a less-translated version closer to the original:

“Granting of exemptions and benefits to enterprises charged with providing services in the field of analytical activities to the United States Forces stationed in the Federal Republic of Germany”

The show’s reporters said they found a 2011 document saying the German government had issued spying licenses to 207 intelligence private-contractor companies that apparently have included, to name just a few, Booz Allen Hamilton, L3 Services Inc., Military Professional Resources Inc. (M.P.R.I.), Galaxy Scientific, The Analytic Sciences Corp. (T.A.S.C.), Science Applications International Corporation (S.A.I.C.), R4, Pluribus International, Bevilacqua Research Corp., Silverback, Information and Infrastructure Technologies (I.I.T.), Electronic Warfare Associates (?? E.W.A.), D.S.R. (?), General Dynamics, D.P.R.A. (?), Computer Sciences Corporation, CACI, GeoEye Analytics, Lockheed Martin. The 2011 document was mentioned because Germans were incensed by Chancellor Angela Merkel’s C.D.U./C.S.U. + F.D.P. coalition government’s claim that it only found out about Prism via the newspapers.

The Frontal 21 report opens with a local mayor’s delightful driving tour around an area called the Dagger Complex in the Hessian town of Griesheim, only 30 km from Frankfurt/Main. Frankfurt apparently has the world’s largest node for internet traffic, operated by a German company called De-Cix. A representative from De-Cix reminded the reporters that any U.S. companies involved with manufacture or operation of the Frankfurt node’s cables or computers could have been forced by U.S. law to violate German law and grant access to the data flowing through them, and ditto for Chinese companies and Chinese law, et cetera. The U.S. firm Level 3 Communications, apparently the world’s biggest data network operator, runs an important computer center for the Frankfurt node. (It said it runs five Germany data centers actually, in Berlin, Hamburg, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt/Main and Munich.) Frontal21 narrator: “Like all U.S. network operators, [Level 3] had to agree to let its data be saved off to America and to give American intelligence agencies access to it.” Commentary from pundit historian Josef Foschepoth concluded the report by saying post-W.W.II German law still provides some outdated protections to allied countries spying on German citizens in violation of German law. He said they used to call it the Alliertes Vorbehaltsrecht and now they’re calling it “legal obligations of the German government.”

(Geh VARE oong   fon   beh FRYE oong en   oont   ferg IN stig oong en   on   oon ta NAME en,   dee   mitt   DEENST lye stoong en   ow! f   dame   geh BEET   on oll it ish ah   TATE ichh kite en   foor   dee   in   dare   BOOND ess ray poob leek   DEUTSCHLAND   shtah tee own EAR ten   TROOP en   dare   fare EYE nichh ten   SHTOT en   beh OW! f trog t   zint.)

Seltene Sprachen und Dialekte, die über Crowdsourcing aufgenommen und gedolmetscht wurden

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have created a free app that lets speakers of endangered languages, whether encountered by academics doing field work or self-selected in networks of colingual neighbors and friends, use relatively cheap Android phones to record their speech. After the sound file is uploaded, people anywhere can listen, stop the playback at any point and record voice translations of the sentences into another language. The translation sound files are linked to the source sound files in the database, creating a vast verbal Rosetta stone that doesn’t require literacy to accomplish preservation and sharing. This archive of vocabulary, grammar and content—tales and histories—will be available for future linguists to explore, centuries from now.

In an interview about the project on Australian ABC Radio National, Dr. Bird said once the person demonstrating the software has explained how it works, it is older people especially in the village who are delighted and start recording story after story in these rare languages.

(ZELL ten ah   SHPRRROCHHH en   oont   dee ah LECKED ah,   dee   über   KRAUT sourcingk   ow! f geh nome en   oont   geh DOLE metched   voor den.)

Lobbyplag

Website that says they use plagiarism software to compare text in politicians’ amendments and lobbyists’ proposals to find out if the amendments contain language copied from companies and industry groups. They’ve published a list of similar texts with politicians’ names and companies’ names. By necessity, the website is highly multilingual.

Lobbyplag.eu says its creation was motivated by the debate around EU data protection reform (with ~4000 amendments apparently inspired by lobbyists from every side of the issues and all corners of the world so far). Lobbyplag is also on Twitter.

 

 

Bourguiba Spracheninstitut

Language institute in Tunisia where Salafists recently tried to halt filming of a “Harlem Shake” video, actually fighting with students and waving but not wielding a Molotov cocktail. After Education Minister Abdellatif Abid (Ettakatol party, a secular center-left ally of Ennahda, Tunisia’s ruling Islamist party) threatened to expell students or fire staff involved in Harlem Shake videos this week, the Tunisian Ministry of Education’s website was hacked and a call went out via social media for a giant H.S. on Friday, March 1.

(Boor GWEE ba   SHPROCHH en in stee toot.)

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