“Der Letzte seines Standes”

“The Last of Their Guild,” an excellent show by the Bavarian Broadcasting Channel (BR). Just as the future is here, but not evenly distributed, so is the past still here in surprising ways. The few episodes I saw captured craftsmanship traditions, obsolete and obsolescing technology, old things being preserved by traditions, old things being preserved by new purposes being found for them and giving them new usefulness, and surviving traces of central Europe’s medieval self-limiting labor organizations. By interviewing the people and filming their workshops and methods, they showed viewers the nuts and bolts of a thrilling variety of old jobs, including barrel makers, wheelwrights, and of course the great one about the guy who still braids buggy whips.

Episodes may include working windmills and water wheels.

(Dare   LET stah   z eye n ess   SHTOND ess.)

Ständige Mitgliederversammlung

“Perpetual members meeting” online, a new system the German Pirate Party is discussing creating to make it easier for them to vote planks into their party platform, closing gaps in their still-too-small election program. Currently they and their “base democracy” goal seem bottlenecked because they only manage to work through and vote on substantial numbers of issues at face-to-face conventions, which only happen twice a year. Hundreds of proposals are submitted online but at most a few dozen can be discussed over a weekend meeting. A 24/7 permanent online meeting tool would not only enable more frequent voting on more issues but also let more people participate in discussion, another Pirate goal. Also the presumable automated history tracking possibilities and potential to reduce redundant effort sound interesting.

Pirates against the SMV criticize the loss of online anonymity necessary to reduce potential sock puppetry by hackers and sysadmins. Among proponents, the excellent Marina Weisband blogged that the Pirate party did promise its voters to be more permeable to their ideas, and this software structure would correct their failure to do so.

Update on 13 May 2013: At 58% yea, the SMV did not get the 2/3 majority vote required to pass.

(SHTEN diggah   MITT glee dah fer ZOM loong.)

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