Feder

Feathers, but it can also mean springs or shock absorbers.

taz.de reported that the big utility Eon is pushing for a fast restart to a nuclear power plant in Grohnde, Lower Saxony, despite safety concerns. The plant would have restarted on 11 May 2014 but there was generator damage. Then foreign bodies turned up in the reactor core—springs or shock absorbers [Feder] had broken off 9 of 131 throttle bodies, which regulate the flow of cooling water around the radioactive fuel rods. Other pressurized-water nuclear reactors in Germany use the same throttle bodies, said taz, but neither Lower Saxony’s environmental minister (Green party) nor the federal environmental minister (S.P.D.) wanted to say which plants these were.

Lower Saxony’s environmental minister has asked Hannoverian prosecutors to investigate tips the ministry received that cracks in the reactor’s secondary circuit had been fixed with temporary welding. Eon was said to have put pressure on the company doing the repairs to even get them to take on the job.

Half the throttle bodies in the Grohnde reactor core have now been replaced. And Eon says calling their welding inadequate is an “abstruse assertion.”

The Grohnde nuclear plant is scheduled to be restarted on Monday, 23 Jun 2014.

Update on 22 Jun 2014: Eon announced today that they restarted the Grohnde nuclear power plant yesterday, after Lower Saxony’s environmental ministry issued the permit to restart on Friday.

Built in 1984, the plant is scheduled to be the last Lower Saxony nuclear power plant taken offline in 2022.

(FEY da.)

#Drosselkom

Twitter hashtag for snark about Deutsche Telekom’s second current scandal, their unilateral decision to choke new flat-rate customers’ Internet tubes after 02 May 2013.

Telekom’s decision against net neutrality might have given permission to its competitors to take similar steps. In April, internet policy activists were concerned that Arcor purchaser and important ISDN competitor Vodafone had started looking into data throttling as well, but that company responded by saying it was not currently considering so doing.

In a 30 May 2013 interview with the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, the president of the German anti-cartel authority [Bundeskartellamt] said that if Deutsche Telekom planned to allow providers to buy their way out of Telekom’s plans to slow down data to its flat-rate consumers, this might be anticompetitive because smaller providers might have trouble paying the new fees charged to resume normal data access or “purchase a priority treatment” as he put it. Yet the anti-cartel authority had decided to neither investigate nor prosecute for anti-competitive market access limitations in this case, merely to get “the clearest possible picture” of the situation. They were concerned that Telekom provide better information to its customers about whether they were close to exceeding data limits and about which services were counting toward customers’ volume limit (companies have until 2016 to make priority partnership agreements with Telekom to have Telekom stop counting their content toward Telekom customers’ volume limits). Also, the president of the anti-cartel authority said, the networks authority [Bundesnetzagentur] would be determining whether network neutrality was being violated enough to require further investigation. The F.A.Z. noted that Telekom is considered a major market player because it controls ~45% of the German DSL market, with ~12.4 million connections, according to the Bundesnetzagentur.

(DROSS ell com.)

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