Frühstück als kunstvolles Festmahl

A breakfast festival feast full of art.

How an Englishman living in Berlin described German breakfasts, according to Frankfurter Rundschau’s excerpt from the German translation of his English book about German culture.

“At weekend breakfasts, every square centimeter of the table is covered by an enormous assortment of cheeses, cold cuts, fruit, jams, honey, spreads and other things.” Fresh rolls from the corner bakery! Well-made croissants. Ripe tomatoes, herbs from the balcony, good yogurt, a warm soft-boiled egg to carefully dismantle in an egg cup, sometimes smoked salmon and inexpensive caviar. Excellent coffee.

(FROO shtook   olls   KOONST foal ess   FEST mall.)

Ufergängerzone

Waterside pedestrian zone.

In the summer of 2013, Paris’s mayor Bertrand Delanoë banned cars on a street for about two kilometers along the left bank of the Seine, creating a zone open to pedestrians and non-motorized two-wheeled contraptions. The wide new walkway goes from Pont de l’Alma to the Musée d’Orsay, creating a four-hectare waterfront idyll in the middle of Paris, said the Frankfurt business newspaper the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The former street now has jungle gyms for kids to play on, large containers of grass and trees, and very good-looking people to watch. It might be quieter too.

This was part of the former mayor’s political philosophy to try to make life more pleasant for nonmotorized inhabitants of his city. During his two terms, the mayor furthermore “got rid of parking spaces, added bus lanes, built new streetcars and started a public rental system for electric autos,” said FAZ.net, also blaming him for Paris’s 20,000 city bikes where the first half-hour is free. Paris now has city bike stands every few hundred meters; “no other city in the world has a network as dense.”

(OOF aw GENG aw TSOWN aw.)

Bällebad

“Balls bath.” Pool filled with brightly colored plastic balls.

(BAY leh bodd.)

Schweifen

Schweifen is swooping, as in ballroom dancers shvife around the dance floor. The past tense version of this word is wonderful: schwuften (SHVOOF ten). Ballroom dancers shvoofed around the dance floor.

If you are “swooped out” (ausgeschweift, ow! ss geh shv eye ft) you have run riot, you are decadent, dissipated.

(Shv EYE fen.)

hohes Tier

“High animal.” Someone with an important job. Helmut Roewer, for example, the now-retired president of Thuringian Verfassungsschutz from 1994 to 2000. Spiegel-Online says his interests were “Wine, Women and Verfassungsschutz.” Apparently Roewer was difficult to work with or manage. According to the “Wine, Women” article, none of the responsible people can now remember appointing him to his post, and Roewer says he doesn’t recall who handed him the written appointment because he was drunk at the time.

Update on 04 Oct. 2012: Helmut Roewer has written a memoir, and Der Spiegel had to read it. “Roewer, who is considered vain and erratic, sees himself as a mover and a shaker.” Originally, Roewer was a West German lawyer. Spiegel calls his book “280 pages of justifications and assigning blame.”

(HO ess TEER.)

Kamakia

The “heroes of the Greek islands” who have been taking care of the special needs of blonde female tourists since the 1960’s.

(Komma kee yah.)

Finanzpolka

“Financial polka”; a song by the band Icke & Er about living from paycheck to paycheck.

(Fee NONTS polllka.)

Stenz

Coxcomb, dandy, fop, swell, popinjay, rake, philanderer, man-about-town.

(Sh tents.)

Hallodri

Entertaining, loud, cheeky man. Irresponsible, charming, interested in wine, women and song. Not serious. Adventurer. Rogue. Party boy.

(Hall OH dree.)

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