Rüstungsexportbericht

Arms exports report.

The Bundessicherheitsrat is a government board that meets secretly to approve German arms exports. Each deal must be separately approved as an exception to the Peace Clause in Germany’s constitution, yet so many are approved that Germany is the world’s #3 weapons exporter after the U.S.A. and Russia.

The permits issued by the Bundessicherheitsrat have been being published once each year in the annual arms exports report. The 2013 report was just published in June 2014, for example.

Reforms are under discussion. Critics of the current system say the report is being published too late and too infrequently. Now it was found that it’s too incomplete as well: The 2013 report did not mention a billion-euro deal to sell tanks, howitzers, mortars and masses of ammunition to Qatar that the previous coalition approved in March 2013.

Apparently it’s an accounting problem that happens to divide the reporting of these large arms deals up into the years of their partial deliveries, making them look smaller. It also happens to obscure when the Bundessicherheitsrat permitted these large deals.

(RISS toongs ex POT bear ICHH t.)

Bericht zur Überwachung

Surveillance report.

This was one German newspaper‘s translation of Vodafone’s Law Enforcement Disclosure Report, which the telecom said will be published annually.

Vodafone’s pioneering Law Enforcement Disclosure Report said that in some of the 29 countries where it does business the governments have connected directly to the telecom’s networks and can listen to its customers’ phone conversations live without involving or informing the company.

Also, in the countries of Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Rumania and South Africa, it is illegal for telecommunications providers to publish how many requests for wiretapping they have received from the government.

(Bear ICHH t   tsoo ah   üb ah VOCHH oong.)

Grundrechte-Report

Fundamental rights report, an annual critique of the treatment of burgher rights and human rights guaranteed by Germany’s constitution. The report is published by eight human rights organizations, including Pro Asyl [For Asylum], Humanistische Union [Humanist Union], Neue Richtervereinigung [New Association of Judges] and the Republikanische Anwältinnen und Anwälteverein [Republican Attorneys Association]. The 2014 edition consists of 42 essays and is sold in bookstores.

Süddeutsche Zeitung reminds us that these basic German human rights include “personality rights, the right to free expression of opinion, letter secrecy, postal secrecy and the right to asylum.”

(GROONED rechh tah   ray PORT.)

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