Grosse Zusammenhänge aus der Sipri-Friedensforschung

Big questions arising from Sipri’s peace research.

In an informal-sounding interview, a researcher from the peace studies institute in Stockholm described some questions observers have about international weapons sales.

Why did Greece need to buy so many guns and tanks?

Why does Saudi Arabia need so many high-tech weapons?

Will China start massively manufacturing and exporting arms?

What new weapons technologies will Russia develop?

Is there a connection between India’s problems with corruption and its status as the world’s biggest arms importer? The research director at Sipri said India’s biggest arms deal scandals involved companies from western countries.

I have some questions myself:

Is it a problem that the French government controls so many French arms manufacturers?

(GROW sah   tsoo ZOM en heng ah   owss   dare   SEE pree   FREE denz foah shoong.)

Barenboimsche Berichtigung

Minutes before a concert in Salzburg, Austria, Daniel Barenboim recorded an appeal for peace that was sent to ZDF heute journal to broadcast on the evening news on 23 Jul 2014.

 

How many people have been killed. Wie viele Menschen sind getötet worden.
How much cruelty. Wie viele Grausamkeit.
And everyone’s right. Und jeder hat recht.
It’s inhuman, what’s happening over there. Es ist ja unmenschlich, was dort passiert.
Why? Warum?
Because there’s only one possibility: that is the future, and the future means, no military solution. Weil es gibt nur eine Möglichkeit: das ist die Zukunft, und die Zukunft heisst, keine militärische Lösung.
This is not a conflict that can be solved by a military action. Es ist nicht ein Konflikt, der durch eine militärische Aktion gelöst sein kann.
It’s a conflict between two peoples, who are deeply convinced that each has the right to live on the same tiny piece of land. That they may live there, and that they must live there. Es ist ein Konflikt zwischen zwei Völkern, die zutiefst überzeugt sind, das Recht zu haben, auf das gleiche, kleine Stückchen Land leben zu dürfen. Und zu müssen.
Without the other group. Ohne die anderen.
And that! That’s what we have to change. Und das! Das müssen wir ändern.
A cease-fire is absolutely necessary. Long overdue, even. Waffenstillstand ist absolut notwendig. Sogar, viel zu spät.
But it’s not enough. Aber es reicht nicht.
We have to bring the parties together, so they can talk with each other, and so they understand first and foremost: that there is no military solution. Wir müssen die Parteien zusammen bringen, dass sie miteinander sprechen, und dass sie als erstes das verstehen: dass es keine militärische Lösung gibt.
And then the rest of the world must provide real support for this. Und dann muss der Rest der Welt das wirklich unterstützen.
Then, it will be very simple, and it can be solved. Dann, wird es sehr einfach sein, und es kann gelöst sein.

Waffenstillstand

“Weapons standstill,” a cease-fire.

(VOFF en SHTILL shtond.)

Ufergängerzone

Waterside pedestrian zone.

In the summer of 2013, Paris’s mayor Bertrand Delanoë banned cars on a street for about two kilometers along the left bank of the Seine, creating a zone open to pedestrians and non-motorized two-wheeled contraptions. The wide new walkway goes from Pont de l’Alma to the Musée d’Orsay, creating a four-hectare waterfront idyll in the middle of Paris, said the Frankfurt business newspaper the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The former street now has jungle gyms for kids to play on, large containers of grass and trees, and very good-looking people to watch. It might be quieter too.

This was part of the former mayor’s political philosophy to try to make life more pleasant for nonmotorized inhabitants of his city. During his two terms, the mayor furthermore “got rid of parking spaces, added bus lanes, built new streetcars and started a public rental system for electric autos,” said FAZ.net, also blaming him for Paris’s 20,000 city bikes where the first half-hour is free. Paris now has city bike stands every few hundred meters; “no other city in the world has a network as dense.”

(OOF aw GENG aw TSOWN aw.)

Friedensklausel des Grundgesetzes

“Peace clause” of the German constitution, Article 26, which says

(1) Actions suitable for and done with the intention of disturbing the peaceful coexistence of peoples, in particular making preparations for carrying out a war of aggression, are unconstitutional. They are to be punished.

(2) Weapons intended for warfare may only be manufactured, transported and disseminated with the approval of the Federal Government. A federal law will regulate this in more detail.

(FREE den z cl ow! zəl   dess   GROONT g’zetsess.)

Gewaltverzicht

Decision to not use violence.

From Willy Brandt’s 28 Oct 1969 address to the Bundestag:

“It is this government’s firm conviction that the policy of abstaining from violence, a policy that respects our partners’ territorial integrity, is a crucial contribution toward a détente in Europe. Abstentions from violence would create an atmosphere that enables further steps.

“This objective is also served by joint efforts to promote trade, technical cooperation and cultural exchange.”

(Geh VAULT fair tsichh t.)

Dann doch!

“Well, okay then.” Actually, this is yet another thrilled German headline about the warming of diplomatic relations between Iran and the U.S.A. The wonderful détente is very exciting. Hopefully, now, we can all get rich together, a wish expressed by my Iranian kitchenmates at German university ten years ago.

A recently published “history of Iran for beginners” said the country had ~38 auto manufacturing companies, presumably in response to international sanctions. Perhaps innovators like Google or Tesla could work out deals with some of these groups to supply novel parts for renewable-energy car projects. There could now be excellent internationally sponsored engineering programs at Iranian universities, and training exchanges around the world.

(Don DOCK.)

 

Sehr beeindruckend

“Very impressive.” The excellent foreign correspondent Dietmar Ossenberg reporting from Tahrir Square on the night of July 1, only a few hours after the Egyptian military issued its 48-hour ultimatum for anti-Morsi and pro-Morsi protesters to find a compromise.

When asked what would happen Monday night, Ossenberg said he didn’t know.

“I don’t know. Peacefully, I hope. It is enormously impressive to see how once more hundreds of thousands of people are demonstrating in this square before the [?] palace, and really very peacefully. Despite the images we just saw of the Muslim Brotherhoods’ main headquarters. The people here are not letting themselves be provoked. They talked beforehand with young people, they practically did training for this, to make sure these mass demonstrations would happen peacefully. So it is really very impressive… We have experienced many historical moments here, but this is really very moving. A speaker for the Egyptian military said today that these are the biggest demonstrations, and peaceful demonstrations, that Egypt has ever seen. That is true in fact, and simultaneously an indication of what side the military will put itself on. I think the erosion process of the power of the Muslim Brotherhood has started. Today we had eleven resignations of ministers, which Morsi refused. But that doesn’t mean anything because these ministers will no longer be carrying out their official business. From the provinces, five provinces, there were reports that the governors’ offices are closed. So people are refusing to follow the central government. So I think the Muslim Brotherhood will have to pivot. They will have to try to approach the people with a compromise. That could be a referendum, for example, which was under discussion tonight in the Muslim Brotherhood, a referendum about whether or not Morsi should stay in office. But I can’t imagine that would impress the people demonstrating in any way, shape or form. So I think that within 48 hours we will not have an agreement, that the military will take over power in a soft coup d’état, perhaps for a transition period, to then together with all the parties, as the Minister of Defense said today, form a type of round table to define a road map for the future. I can’t imagine after the last 48 hours that Egypt’s history is not about to be rewritten again. The sole hope remaining for us, however, is that this happens relatively peacefully. But this year the army promised they would try to prevent violent conflicts. However, one must respond to that by saying that the people here relied once before on promises made by the military and were bitterly disappointed.”

(Z air   beh EYE n drook end.)

Minister für Nationale Aussöhnung

Syria’s Minister of State for National Reconciliation Affairs responded positively on 12 Feb to the Syrian opposition-in-exile’s 10-Feb offer of dialog, agreeing to direct talks if they might result in elections in Syria.

(Min EASTER   fir   ow! ss LEN dish eh   ow! ss ZÖ noong.)

Blog at WordPress.com.