“Wenn das Angebot erst einmal in dieser Breite vorhanden ist, dann wird die Nachfrage sich einstellen”

“When supply is available in this [amplitude/latitude], then the demand will adjust,” transport minister Peter Ramsauer (C.S.U.) said at the May 2013 electromobility summit in Berlin, explaining how supply was going to drive demand for electric cars in Germany. Though his government certainly wanted more electric cars on German roads, they said they would continue not giving individual consumers subventions or tax rebates for purchasing the expensive but environmentally friendly vehicles. Only ~7000 electric cars were registered in Germany (pop. ~80 million). Electric car prices in Germany were considered high by consumers and everyone—government, car makers and consumers—agreed there weren’t many models to choose from. Auto manufacturers at the government-hosted electromobility conference said on 27 May 2013 they hoped to increase the electric car models for sale in Germany to ~15 by 2015.

Update on 26 Nov 2013: Norway is promoting electric cars more than any other country in the world, with free downtown parking, free downtown recharging, no taxes on purchases of new electric automobiles (omitting 25% V.A.T., import fees and tariffs, import customs charges), no highway tolls and permission to drive in bus lanes. Rich in oil and water, Norway has been selling the oil internationally and using the water to create free electricity for electric cars at home, to meet the country’s 2017 carbon emissions reduction goals. The ~5 million Norwegians own about 14,000 electric cars, which have become the most popular vehicles people are applying to register there, unseating the Volkswagen Golf.

(Ven   doss   ON geh boat   eahst   moll   inn   dee zah   BR-R-R-IGHT ah   foah hond en   issed,   don   vee ahd   dee   NOCHH fr-r-rog ah   zichh   eye n shtell en.)

Kniefall

The “knee fall.”

Willy Brandt (whose birth name was Herbert Frahm), had a difficult childhood and fled as a young socialist to Oslo in 1933, tasked with starting an underground cell there to fight Hitler. He was able to start studying history in Oslo, after never being able to afford college in his native Germany. In 1936 he briefly returned to Nazi Germany posing as a war reporter with a Norwegian accent. He also reported from the Spanish Civil War. In 1940 he was arrested in occupied Norway but managed to flee to Sweden, where he founded a Norwegian-Swedish press agency that supplied news to 70 dailies.

In 1940, Brandt had a daughter in Stockholm who was named Ninja.

Brandt returned to Germany in 1945 to report on the Nuremberg Trials. He assumed a cover name he had been using since 1934, “Willy Brandt,” and moved to Berlin because it was a bit more cosmopolitan.

After becoming a Bundestag member (SPD), the mayor of West Berlin, foreign minister, and the Chancellor of Germany (slogan: “Dare more democracy”), Willy Brandt traveled to Poland in 1970 and fell to his knees to demonstrate sorrow at a monument commemorating the Warsaw ghetto uprising of 1943. This is called the Kniefall in German and was made with great respect.

(Derk NEE foll.)

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