Söldner- und Rüstungslobbyisten

Lobbying groups advocating for European military service providers and arms manufacturers include:

International Peace Operations Association, a lobbying group founded in 2001 in Washington, D.C., that represents the interests of mercenary companies around the world. G4S’s Defence Systems Limited was a cofounder, with five? other companies.

I.P.O.A. said they changed their name to International Stability Operations Association in 2010.

United Kingdom:

British Association of Private Security Companies.

Germany:

Förderkreis Deutsches Heer, a German lobbying group. Founded in 1995, its members are politicians, soldiers and weapons manufacturers. A vice-president was apparently found guilty of corruption in a French-German tanks deal.

In 2009, some members of the Bundestag’s Defense Committee [Verteidigungsausschuss] were found to have not reported their involvement with the Förderkreis Deutsches Heer, including seats on its Präsidium board, though they were required to do so by the Bundestag’s rules of procedure. The Bundestag members said they didn’t have to because the association is a nonprofit organization and they were volunteering.

Gesellschaft für Wehr- und Sicherheitspolitik, a German association of military interests and government founded after World War II as a forum for discussion that would help safely re-arm Germany, something many people objected to. GfW says it does public relations work, via speakers and conferences. In 1999 it was accused of being a lobbying group for arms manufacturers and using taxpayer money to pay right-wing extremist speakers, and in 2007 it was accused of working with a French group founded by a former Nazi. In 2009, Lobbycontrol criticized that multiple Bundestag members had not sufficiently disclosed their side income from GfW. The GfW is also fragmented, into subgroups.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Wehrtechnik, founded shortly after the GfW in 1957 apparently also as part of the move to re-arm Germany because it was created as an initiative of the procurement division of the Bundeswehr. Its members appear to be politicians and soldiers. This association says it is a neutral discussion and information platform to promote German security, military technology and military technology business, and knowledge about them.

In 2009, some members of the Bundestag’s Defense Committee [Verteidigungsausschuss] were found to have not reported that they were simultaneously on the Präsidium board of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Wehrtechnik, though they were required to do so by the Bundestag’s rules of procedure. The Bundestag members said they forgot because the association is a nonprofit organization and they weren’t paid for being on its board.

Deutsche Sicherheits- und Verteidigungsindustrie, or Federation of German Security & Defence Industries (B.D.S.V.), was founded in 2009 and has the goals of improving the weapons industry’s image and awakening understanding for German arms manufacturers’ situation. In an article that mentioned this group, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung said German weapons manufacturers are currently exporting nearly half their output, and that the Deutsche Sicherheits- und Verteidigungsindustrie estimated about 100,000 people were employed in this sector.

(ZILLED nah   oont   RISS toongs lobby ISSED en.)

Söldnerfirmen

Mercenary companies. Private military contractors in Europe include:

United Kingdom:

G4S, formerly Group 4 Securicor, is based in London and is one of the world’s largest employers, employing ~620,000 worldwide. Created in 2004 when the U.K.’s Securicor merged with the British-Danish Group 4 Falck.

G4S acquired a large U.K.-U.S. competitor and Iraq & Afghanistan contractor, Armorgroup, in 2008 (cf. Defence Systems Ltd below).

Other interesting G4S acquisitions:

Wackenhut (U.S.A., 2002), Progard Securitas (Serbia, 2008), ArmorGroup (see Defence Systems Limited below; U.S.A./U.K., 2008), Touchcom which “installs and maintains web-based electronic security systems and facility management software” (U.S.A., 2008) and GLS, “a provider of outsourced justice services,” i.e. a prisons contractor (U.K., 2008). English Wikipedia listed, among the 2009 acquisitions, “Secura Monde International Limited and Shiremoor International Engineering Limited, together, the UK’s leading specialist banknote and high security technical and commercial advisory companies; All Star International for $60M, one of the premier facilities management and base operations support companies providing services to the US Government; Adesta, US-based provider of integrated security systems and communication systems; and Hill & Associates Consultants Limited, Asia’s leading provider of specialist risk-mitigation consulting services.” In 2010 they bought a large South African security firm. In 2011, they bought an electronic monitoring device manufacturer and what looks like a U.K. alarm system company.

Clients include Israel.

Complaints were made about Wackenhut’s guarding of U.S. nuclear facilities and military bases due to employee behavior that didn’t meet requirements. In 2013 G4S said they would be divesting themselves of their U.S. government services contractors.

Defence Systems Limited, an early private military contractor (est. 1981) that the founder of Hart Group managed before he left and founded Hart in 1999. DSL was run by Hart’s Richard Bethell, now Lord Westbury, and Sir Alistair Morrison. The company was bought in 1997 by a Florida manufacturer of body armor, riot-control equipment and armored vehicles, merged into a company headquartered in Wyoming, then became ArmorGroup, which was bought by the British giant G4S in 2008, bringing in about 9000 employees. It appears they also merged with an offshoot of the Soviet K.G.B., called Alpha-A (est. 1991), in 1997—the K.G.B.’s Alpha group is said to have helped with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and suppressing protests in Lithuania. Before G4S acquired them, DSL’s clients included oil companies, mining companies, government embassies, international organizations hiring them for post-conflict humanitarian missions and groups around the world hiring them for counterinsurgency training. ArmorGroup still existed after G4S’s 2008 buyout and removal from the London Stock Exchange, because in 2009 they lost the contract to supply the security for the U.S. embassy in Kabul due to employee behavior that didn’t meet requirements.

Hart Group, established in 1999 by former British military officer Richard Bethell, now Lord Westbury, the group’s headquarters are in Bermuda. A website said their website once said, “Hart specialises in mitigating security risk globally, across land, sea and air.” That is essentially what their website still says today, only bigger.

The originally-British Hart Group’s companies include: CTG Global, Erinys International, Hart, Longport Aviation, Symbion Power and Hart Maritime Hubs:

CTG Global: part of Hart Group, which says CTG does “human resource management and consultancy services.” Their website says they specialize in post-conflict humanitarian work.

Erinys International, a British private security company headquartered in the Virgin Islands. Founded in 2001 by a former British military officer, it grew big in 2004 fulfilling contracts in Iraq. A subsidiary of Hart Group, which says Erinys does “risk mitigation across Africa primarily in the Oil and Gas sector.”

Longport Security‘s website says, “Prevent acts of unlawful inteference with Civil Aviation.” This is another subsidiary of Hart Group.

Symbion Power is a U.S. engineering firm that has been awarded massive contracts for rebuilding Iraq’s electricity infrastructure. A member of Hart Group.

Aegis, a British firm hired by the U.S. to oversee U.S. contractors in Iraq. Aegis employees were allegedly the ones shooting at Iraqi civilians in video that surfaced in 2005.

Rubicon International, a British firm that e.g. recruited for Erinys and merged with Aegis in 2005.

AKE Group, a U.K. firm (est. 1991) with offices around the world that provides security and intelligence services.

Babylon Gates Ltd provides patrol and detection dogs, de-mining and security services.

Control Risks Group, a British firm that provided guard services in Iraq. Apparently originally founded in 1974 to provide risk analysis to Lloyd’s of London? Now a major private military contractor.

Edinburgh International, based in London and Dubai, provides “risk management and security.”

FSI Worldwide might be a British company that provides military services. Their website says they got their start in 2006 providing Gurkha contracting and they have a British charity.

Genric Security, a British firm that provided security services in Iraq in partnership with the Kuwait-based Arab Orient Group.

Global Risk, a British firm that provided security in Iraq.

Henderson Risk, a British firm that worked in Iraq. Today their website says they provide “Business Intelligence, Asset Protection and Crisis Management services.”

Infinite Security Solutions, a company registered in Anguilla, the Virgin Islands, Ghana, Hong Kong, Singapore and the U.K. that provides risk management services on land and sea. Affiliated with London insurance companies.

International Defence Systems UK Ltd, a company that provides air support parts and services.

Risk Advisory Group, a British umbrella group for private military contractors.

Janusian, a risk management subsidiary of the British Risk Advisory Group.

New Century consulting, founded by a Belfast-born top British officer in Iraq. Provides police and military services and training.

Olive Group is a for-hire security services company headquartered in Dubai who are apparently helping write some of the U.K.’s standards and codes of conduct for private military companies. During the second Iraq war they had an office in Mayfair, London, U.K.

Restrata was an Olive Group company guarding a large housing development construction project outside Baghdad.

Pilgrims Group, a British firm that provides security and intelligence support and training, as well as security, surveillance and communications equipment.

Saladin Security, Ltd, previously known as KMS, Ltd, is a London-based company established in 1975 that provides security services, equipment and training. And kidnap & extortion mitigation.

Security Support Solutions, 3S, a London company founded in 2003. Bloomberg Businessweek’s profile said 3S “provides armoured vehicles; helicopter solutions; aviation security; maritime security; and security consulting, including risk assessment, threat analysis, and vulnerability assessment. It serves governments, NGO’s, private security companies, news agencies, and the military sector.”

Malta:

Tangiers Group, an organization based in Malta and affiliated with Lloyd’s of London that has the following subsidiaries:

Tangiers International, “the high touch, frontline medical and emergency services division of the group.”

Tangiers Global, “the insurance underwriting and brokerage arm of the organisation.”

The Organisation for Better Security or OBS, “a membership community for Tangiers’ clients that provides actionable intelligence about conditions in conflict zones.”

Ireland:

Reconnaissance Group, based in Dublin. Their website says they enable business to be done in hostile environments, providing services under the categories of “Reconnaissance Market Entry, Security & Risk Management, Executive Protection, Project Support, Crisis Management, Intelligence & Investigations, TSCM (de-bugging), Cultural Awareness Training.”

Reconnaissance Trace Management Security Services & Key Holding, a subsidiary of Reconnaissance Group, says their name stands for Tracking, Reconnaissance Intelligence Management Solutions (RIMS), Alarms, CCTV and Electronic Surveillance Counter Measures.

Sweden:

Securitas AB, in Sweden. Owns the Pinkerton detective agency now. In 2012, they had about 300,000 employees around the world.

The company that became Group 4 was formed as a division of Securitas AB in 1968. In 1981 it was it was separated from Securitas AB when the owner’s sons divided the company’s Swedish and international operations after buying out their father. The international entity became known as Group 4 because it combined four British security companies. They merged with the Danish Falck in 2000 to form Group 4 Falck, which merged with the British Securicor in 2004 to form the world’s biggest security firm by revenue and the world’s second or third-largest employer by employees, G4S.

 The Securitas founder’s sons bought the company from him in 1976 and reorganized it in 1981. The Securitas remainder was sold in 1983. The company’s enormous expansion began in 1989.

Security firms acquired by Securitas include, in addition to the famous Pinkertons,

Protectas SA, a Swiss security company.

Update on 08 Jul 2014: Munich police searched 13 Securitas “objects,” including offices and a suspect’s villa, because the company is suspected of subcontracting work in exchange for bribes. The company informed police themselves after receiving a tip. Securitas’s Munich branch has about 1400 employees and is subordinated to a holding company in Düsseldorf.

Denmark:

Falck, which merged into Securitas AB and then G4S, was a Danish security company.

France:

Secopex, based in Carcassone and founded in 2003, with a structure “based on the large Anglo-American companies that dominate this sector,” according to a 2011 newspaper article written because one of their top officers was killed in Benghazi.

Germany:

Ecolog International provides services to the German Bundeswehr and clients from other N.A.T.O. countries and was able to grow as a company via contracts in the post-9/11 interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq. German media said Ecolog has created a complicated Geflecht of subsidiaries around the world that are legally independent entities, making the enterprise less transparent. Employees of the company have been investigated in several countries for money laundering and drug smuggling.

Interesting story in the Frankfurter Rundschau: During the Bundeswehr’s deployment in Afghanistan, they had problems in 2006 with camouflage uniforms coming back from Ecolog’s laundry services slightly pink in color, which could make the soldiers more visible on night patrols, “with appropriate viewing devices,” F.R. said. It was attributed to using the wrong soap, and contracts were changed twice to prescribe which soap should be used. But it sounds like someone just threw in a red sock at the laundry.

Spain:

Ge2b Seguridad Internacional, a Spanish company that provides security-related manpower and services to governments and industry.

(ZILLED nah FEAH men.)

Detekteien

Private detective agencies. A Spiegel.de article dated 2008 said this was an unregulated and unsupervised but burgeoning security industry in Germany, sometimes employing former Stasi cooperators. The authors estimated there were ~1500 private detective companies in Germany in 2008 and about a dozen key world players, including the New York-based Kroll and London-based Control Risks. Many of these companies earned game-changing amounts of money in Iraq after the second U.S. invasion. They could be hired via law firms protected by attorney-client privilege, and subcontract jobs to other firms, obscuring cause-and-effect. A new C.E.O. of Control Risks said they were also hiring journalists to spy on other journalists.

A Detektei called Network Deutschland was “involved” in the German rail company Deutsche Bahn’s data privacy scandal when it was caught spying on its employees in 2009, leading to the retirement of C.E.O. Hartmut Mehdorn. Network Deutschland was also involved in the former-monopoly phone company Deutsche Telekom’s so-called “Telekom data scandal,” which is confusing but included T-mobile’s years of archiving communications data of members of its own supervisory boards, such as the head of the German trade union association Deutsche Gewerkschaftsbund. T-mobile was especially interested in any phone interactions with journalists. Deutsche Telekom was also accused of using private detectives to spy on journalists in other ways.

The 2013 Snowden revelations might provide some insight into the means private detective companies could have used to access these communications and banking data. Online ads and tech articles seem to be indicating that powerful N.S.A.-type tools are now trickling down into the regular economy, being sold to smaller and smaller entities.

N.B.: How early did the notoriously technophilic and well-funded U.S. National Football League know about some of these capabilities?

An English-language Spiegel.de article dated 2008 speculated about the separate huge data hoards controlled by the national rail (Deutsche Bahn), national airline (Lufthansa), post office (Deutsche Post) and phone company (Deutsche Telekom), all companies found to have made questionable investigations and hired detective agencies. The magazine couldn’t show that they had combined their data in 2008 though; they also only connected up e.g. that Deutsche Bahn and Deutsche Telekom hired the same detective agency but Lufthansa and (Telekom?) investigated the same journalist (Tasso Enzweiler from Financial Times Deutschland, which folded in 2012). The Spiegel article wanted to but could not show that the four big corporations also investigated each other, but it reminded us they were well positioned to investigate each other and anyone else in Germany. The Spiegel.de article didn’t want to feed conspiracy theorists but hoped the German government wasn’t asking these companies for access to their sensitive customer data. All four used to be state-owned and the German government still held large stakes in Deutsche Bahn and Deutsche Telekom.

(Day tect EYE en.)

“Gewährung von Befreiungen und Vergünstigungen an Unternehmen, die mit Dienstleistungen auf dem Gebiet analytischer Tätigkeiten für die in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland stationierten Truppen der Vereinigten Staaten beauftragt sind”

Frontal 21 investigative reporters discovered that Germany’s governments issued permits to private-sector U.S. firms to spy on German soil at least as far back as August 2003, when the Foreign Office under Joschka Fischer (Green party) happened to create the earliest documentation found for this so far by publishing in the German Federal Gazette [Bundesgesetzblatt, BGB] some proposed amendments to what looks like a 2001 permit issued to the U.S.A.:

“Granting of exemptions and advantages to companies commissioned with services in the field of analytical activities for United States troops stationed in the Federal Republic of Germany” [Translation of the German BGB version.]

This English text from another news program might be a less-translated version closer to the original:

“Granting of exemptions and benefits to enterprises charged with providing services in the field of analytical activities to the United States Forces stationed in the Federal Republic of Germany”

The show’s reporters said they found a 2011 document saying the German government had issued spying licenses to 207 intelligence private-contractor companies that apparently have included, to name just a few, Booz Allen Hamilton, L3 Services Inc., Military Professional Resources Inc. (M.P.R.I.), Galaxy Scientific, The Analytic Sciences Corp. (T.A.S.C.), Science Applications International Corporation (S.A.I.C.), R4, Pluribus International, Bevilacqua Research Corp., Silverback, Information and Infrastructure Technologies (I.I.T.), Electronic Warfare Associates (?? E.W.A.), D.S.R. (?), General Dynamics, D.P.R.A. (?), Computer Sciences Corporation, CACI, GeoEye Analytics, Lockheed Martin. The 2011 document was mentioned because Germans were incensed by Chancellor Angela Merkel’s C.D.U./C.S.U. + F.D.P. coalition government’s claim that it only found out about Prism via the newspapers.

The Frontal 21 report opens with a local mayor’s delightful driving tour around an area called the Dagger Complex in the Hessian town of Griesheim, only 30 km from Frankfurt/Main. Frankfurt apparently has the world’s largest node for internet traffic, operated by a German company called De-Cix. A representative from De-Cix reminded the reporters that any U.S. companies involved with manufacture or operation of the Frankfurt node’s cables or computers could have been forced by U.S. law to violate German law and grant access to the data flowing through them, and ditto for Chinese companies and Chinese law, et cetera. The U.S. firm Level 3 Communications, apparently the world’s biggest data network operator, runs an important computer center for the Frankfurt node. (It said it runs five Germany data centers actually, in Berlin, Hamburg, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt/Main and Munich.) Frontal21 narrator: “Like all U.S. network operators, [Level 3] had to agree to let its data be saved off to America and to give American intelligence agencies access to it.” Commentary from pundit historian Josef Foschepoth concluded the report by saying post-W.W.II German law still provides some outdated protections to allied countries spying on German citizens in violation of German law. He said they used to call it the Alliertes Vorbehaltsrecht and now they’re calling it “legal obligations of the German government.”

(Geh VARE oong   fon   beh FRYE oong en   oont   ferg IN stig oong en   on   oon ta NAME en,   dee   mitt   DEENST lye stoong en   ow! f   dame   geh BEET   on oll it ish ah   TATE ichh kite en   foor   dee   in   dare   BOOND ess ray poob leek   DEUTSCHLAND   shtah tee own EAR ten   TROOP en   dare   fare EYE nichh ten   SHTOT en   beh OW! f trog t   zint.)

Abgucken

“Looking off.” Looking at something and then copying it. Rome for example spent centuries inadvertently serving as a model to the tribes outside its borders, while trying to deal with them by alternately fighting them, bribing them and training them as mercenaries. Eventually some surrounding tribes that were feindlich gesinnt learned enough, formed large enough groups and took over the old empire.

(OB cook en.)

Bettgeflüster

“Bed whispers,” German title of the old movie “Pillow Talk” starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson. Ezra Klein’s blog on the Washington Post recently posted about different types of public and private employees who have been caught or might be caught inappropriately making use of the vast phone and internet databases being collected and shared by e.g. the N.S.A.; one of the the least problematic bad uses so far has been to laugh about people’s private pillow talk.

Policemen: Police officers around the U.S.A. were caught using the F.B.I.’s huge N.C.I.C. database to snoop on each other, their significant others or, in one case, women a policeman wanted to cook and eat.

Military: The N.S.A. is part of the military. Fwiw, they said only a small number of people can search their phone records database (Edward Snowden?). A former N.S.A. employee told ABC in 2008 that N.S.A. employees used to listen to overseas soldiers’ phone sex.

Spies: There are fears inside and outside the U.S.A. that intelligence agencies around the world are spying on each other’s domestic populations as a favor to help local agencies circumvent laws protecting their citizens against domestic surveillance by their own governments. As a favor then your country’s communications data would be bulk-hoovered by at least one other country’s intelligence agencies and stored there before being shared with your country’s intelligence agencies…

Mercenaries: If 70% of the U.S.’s intelligence budget has been spent on private contractors in recent years, including on Edward Snowden’s former employer, then tens of thousands of guys must have worked these jobs by now with access to databases and powerful tools.

Telecommunications companies: Ars Technica posted that U.S. intelligence agencies partner with a U.S. telecom company to (somehow) collect phone and internet data from local telecom companies in foreign countries. Providing historical perspective, WaPo wrote that when giant fiber optics network operator Global Crossing went bankrupt in 2002 and was being bid on by firms from Hong Kong and Singapore, the U.S.A.’s F.C.C. held up approval of the deal until systems for U.S. government access to those networks had been agreed to. That model, worked out by reps from Defense, Justice and Homeland Security departments, has now been used by the F.C.C.’s “Team Telecom” for other telecom companies too. Phone companies, phone companies that provide internet connections, cable television companies that provide internet connections and companies that run, maintain or manage copper, fiber optic, satellite and other networks: all have employees and consultants that might also be able to access such data.

Software and content providers: “nine major” U.S. companies including Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo and AOL have been sharing customer communication data with U.S. intelligence agencies; their employees and consultants might also be able to access these data.

News agencies and newspapers: Rupert Murdoch’s phone-hacking scandal in London indicates at least U.K. journalists have succeeded in paying police to acquire the kind of private information stored in these big databases. Such news companies’ employees and consultants, and their subsidiaries’ and parent corporations’ employees and consultants, and anyone capable of tapping journalists’ insecure computers and phones, might access all journalists’ data including those data obtained from police.

(BETT geh FLÜÜ stah.)

MISO-Süppchen

“A little MISO soup.” The US Defense Department has changed the name of Psy-Ops, psychological operations, to the more pleasant-sounding MISO, military information support operations. Private contractors such as Navanti Group provide MISO to e.g. the vastly grown Special Operations Command, SOC, in Tampa, Florida, according to the Washington Post.

In a 07 Jul 2013 article about how Navanti created a dossier on a US citizen living in Minnesota, WaPo wrote:

“The Pentagon is legally prohibited from conducting psychological operations at home or targeting U.S. audiences with propaganda, except during ‘domestic emergencies.’ Defense Department rules also forbid the military from using psychological operations to ‘target U.S. citizens at any time, in any location globally, or under any circumstances.’

“Last year, however, two USA Today journalists were targeted in an online propaganda campaign after they revealed that the Pentagon’s top propaganda contractor in Afghanistan owed millions of dollars in back taxes. A co-owner of the firm later admitted that he established fake Web sites and used social media to attack the journalists anonymously.”

(Me zo ZIPP chhen.)

EU-Datenschutzreform

“EU data protection reform” of the EU’s current data protection rules which were passed in 1995.

EU commissioner for justice, fundamental rights and citizenship Viviane Reding said she’s been fighting for this reform for several years now. A proposal she submitted 18 months ago has been languishing, even though the EU’s highly controversial “Vorratsdatenspeicherung-Richtlinie” [data retention directive] was negotiated in under six months, she said according to an 11 Jun 2013 Spiegel article. Laws restricting consumer rights are thus apparently passed much faster than laws guaranteeing consumer rights, in the USA and in the EU.

Reding’s EU data protection reform proposal would allow EU residents’ data to be shared outside the EU if there were appropriate legal protections in place in the recipient countries or organizations. Apparently EU citizens (and US citizens?) cannot sue in US courts in response to inappropriate sharing of their data, for example, so until that changes EU citizens’ sensitive data could not be shared with US groups. On the other hand, as Reding said in a speech at the Dublin summit on 14 Jun 2013, “In Europe, also in cases involving national security, every individual—irrespective of their nationality—can go to a Court, national or European, if they believe that their right to data protection has been infringed. Effective judicial redress is available for Europeans and non-Europeans alike. This is a basic principle of European law.”

Reding’s original proposal said there had to be a Rechtshilfeabkommen, bilateral legal assistance agreement, between the EU and the recipient country, but that bit was deleted before the Prism scandal broke in response to pressure from Washington DC. A group of European parliament members including Jan Philipp Albrecht (Green Party, Germany) and Josef Weidenholzer (Social Democrat, Austria) are now pushing to have the provision put back into the proposal. There is no mutual legal assistance agreement between the USA and the EU.

While some actors in the USA’s recently public “lawless space of the secret services Moloch around the NSA and FBI with its opaque/unmanageable network of private mercenary companies” [“rechtsfreie{r} Raum des Geheimdienstmolochs um NSA und FBI mit ihrem unüberschaubaren Netz an privaten Söldnerfirmen” (F.A.Z., 14 Jun 2013)] might consider themselves not constrained by updated EU data protection rules, Reding’s proposed economic penalties of up to 2% of their international annual gross on companies that incorrectly share EU residents’ sensitive data might have a better deterrent effect on nonshadowlands companies.

(Eh Oo   DOT en shoots ray form.)

Mietspion

“Rent-a-spy” cybermercenaries, outsourced espionage.

Der Spiegel reported that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden worked for a billion-dollar private company, like a “digital Blackwater,” called Booz Allen Hamilton. With $5.8 billion revenue in 2012? 70% of BAH’s stock is held today by Carlyle Group? Carlyle Group’s website said it has $176 billion “in assets under management” in 2013. A press release on Booz Allen’s website said Carlyle Group had $82 billion “of assets under management” in 2008, when they acquired Booz Allen.

With clients and branch offices around the world, what’s to stop a company that invents, obtains and markets cyberwarfare “solutions” from accelerating or even creating a cyberwarfare arms race by hard-selling hardware and software and hawkish advice to several competing countries at once?

Booz Allen’s locations include: USA, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, Qatar and United Arab Emirates.

Booz Allen’s alumni include:

  • James Clapper, current Director of US National Intelligence
  • J. Michael McConnell, NSA Director (1992–1996) and Director of US National Intelligence (2007–2009)
  • R. James Woolsey, CIA Director (1993–1995)

(METE shpee own.)

Generalsekretariat für Staatseinnahmen

“General Secretariat for Revenues,” a newly created department in the Greek government responsible for checking government income. Its head used to be in charge of the Greek General Secretariat for Information Systems (GSIS). In response to the “Offshore Leaks” data release last week, the Greek Revenues office will be investigating, among other things, a chain of offshore companies that have been providing military technology to Greece and the USA but whose actual ownership remains a mystery.

The Süddeutsche Zeitung reported: “Interoperability Systems International Hellas S.A. […] was co-awarded a 190-million euro order in 2003 for kitting out Greek F-16 fighter jets. The company also delivered hardware and software to the US Marines. In 2003, 33% of ISI belonged to Bounty Investments Ltd., which in turn owned part of another offshore company. Over that company there was a third veil as well. An attorney for ISI Hellas said Bounty Investments ‘fulfilled all requirements of the Greek tax authorities.’ Some experts think companies in the defense sector fundamentally ought not to be messing around in cloudy offshore waters.”

Update on 10 Apr 2013: This highly entertaining* SZ article about a British family that managed letterbox companies (Briefkastenfirmen) in New Zealand and includes Miami, Moscow, Pyongyang, Teheran and Vanuatu notes that it becomes impossible to trace ownership after only three to four “dummy companies” (Scheinfirmen). “After three, four dummy companies in a row the track gets lost in a thicket of commercial registers (Handelsregister, HRB).”

(Genn er OLL seck rett arr ee OTT   foor   SHTOTS eye nom men.)

 * highly entertaining until the deaths of two Russian reformers at the very end of the piece: Sergej Magnitskij (37) and Alexander Perepilitschnij (44).

 

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