Beibehaltung

Retention.

April 2013: After it became known the chair of the supervisory board [Aufsichtsrat] of Germany’s richest and most successful soccer team, Bayern Munich, was under investigation for voluntarily reporting himself [Selbstanzeige] as having an insufficiently reported and taxed ~500 million euros in a Swiss bank account, there seem to remain some loose ends in his origin story for where the half billion came from*. Yet on 06 May 2013 Bayern Munich’s supervisory board voted not to accept Uli Hoeneß’s resignation as its head. Members of the supervisory board who supported Mr. Hoeneß at this meeting included: Herbert Hainer, C.E.O. of Adidas. Rupert Stadler, C.E.O. of Audi. Timotheus Höttges, chief of Finances and Controlling at top Bayern sponsor Deutsche Telekom. Martin Winterkorn, C.E.O. of Volkswagen. Edmund Stoiber (C.S.U.), former candidate for German chancellor in the C.D.U./C.S.U. party.

10 May 2013: Mr. Hoeneß is suing the responsible prosecutor’s office for being the source of the press’s discovery of the investigation into the mysterious half billion euros, in April 2013.

30 Jul 2013: Uli Hoeneß has been charged with alleged tax evasion. The Economic Crimes Chamber [Wirtschaftsstrafkammer] of the second Munich Landgericht [Münchener Landgericht II] must now decide whether it will allow the trial to proceed and whether to open the main trial. The decision is expected in late September 2013.

04 Aug 2013: The president of the German Soccer Association [Deutscher Fussballbund e.V., D.F.B.], Wolfgang Niersbach, declared his support for Uli Hoeneß.

07 Aug 2013: Stern.de report that an anonymous informant told the second state prosecutors office in Munich [Münchener Staatsanwaltschaft II] that Mr. Hoeneß’s untaxed millions are not limited to one account at the Swiss Vontobel bank (said by prosecutors to have contained 500 million Swiss francs but said by Mr. Hoeneß in April 2013 never to have exceeded around 15 to 20 million euros, tops). Stern.de reported the informant said Mr. Hoeneß’s Vontobel account had balances consistently [“durchgehend“] exceeding 500 million Swiss francs in years before 2008 and also supplied information about stock dealings and transactions involving numbered accounts at three other Swiss banks: Crédit Suisse, Julius Bär and the Zürcher Kantonalbank.

The whistleblower said Deutsche Telekom stock with which Mr. Hoeneß participated in so-called dividend stripping was also involved.

04 Nov 2013: Mr. Hoeneß will have to “answer before a court” after all, starting ~10 Mar 2014. Landgericht Munich II’s “Economic Chamber” [Wirtschaftskammer] announced it will allow trial of charges against him of tax evasion and providing inaccurate answers. His Selbstanzeige earlier this year “contained errors.”

Frank Bräutigam, ARD tagesschau.de’s excellent legal correspondent, said the trial will evaluate the correctness of the Selbstanzeige (timeliness, completeness and accuracy). If the court determines that the Selbstanzeige was not properly executed, next it must decide how much money was improperly handled and what penalties could be imposed.

The Bayern Munich football club’s supervisory board reconfirmed that they want to retain Mr. Hoeneß as president of the club.

14 Mar 2014: Uli Hoeneß’s trial for 3.5 million euros of tax evasion was this week. In the two weeks before the trial started on Monday, he apparently gave prosecutors 50,000, some said 70,000, pages of Vontobel bank account statements previously withheld. On Monday he surprised reporters by announcing he’d actually not paid 18 million euros tax, but this was the ultimate number, no more revelations. On Tuesday, an auditor testified that the amount was actually 27 million. He was found guilty of 28.5 million euros in tax evasion and sentenced to 3.5 years, which will probably be in an open prison. On Friday, he said he would not appeal. The prosecutors may still decide to appeal. Uli Hoeneß resigned as president of the FC Bayern Munich soccer club and chair of FC Bayern Munich Inc.’s supervisory board.

Mr. Hoeneß’s salary tended to be about 10 million euros per year. The Vontobel account never had more than 150 million euros in it at one time.

(BY beh HALT oong.)

* Mr. Hoeneß said he netted 500 million euros between 2000 and 2012 by compulsively playing the stock market starting with a 10-million-euro combination gift/loan in 2000 from a now-deceased friend, a former C.E.O. of Adidas.

DeuBa

Syllabbreviation for the Deutsche Bank. Whose co-chief, Jürgen Fitschen, has apologized for phoning Hessian governor Volker Bouffier (CDU) after the Frankfurt district attorney’s 500-man razzia on 12/12 (but before the Munich district attorney’s 10-man razzia on 12/20, the latest Leo Kirch-related search of DeuBa premises) to complain that the Frankfurt district attorney’s 500-man razzia may have damaged the Deutsche Bank’s image. Fitschen’s phone call has been roundly condemned by German politicians in a [2011 Anglicism of the Year].

One expert has speculated that Fitschen fell on his sword so that duarch Anshu Jain can remain unfired. I’m wondering how the press learned about the phone call.

Süddeutsche Zeitung journalist Klaus Ott said the Deutsche Bank was warned by the Frankfurt D.A. last summer. “There was a sort of yellow card, a dark-yellow card, half a year ago, and the Deutsche Bank knew that if they didn’t cooperate there would be a search.”

Update on 03 Apr 2014: A blogger reviewing Michael Lewis’s new book on high-frequency trading mentioned an interesting relationship between the Securities and Exchange Commission, Deutsche Bank and the global financial crisis of 2008:

“The SEC’s head of enforcement, Robert Khuzami, was general counsel for the Americas for Deutsche Bank from 2004 to 2009. And who did Lewis reveal to be one of the biggest instigators of the subprime short and related CDO sales? Gregg Lippmann of Deutsche Bank, patient zero of this strategy. Any serious investigation of CDO malfeasance would implicate Khuzami.”
—Yves Smith

(Doy! Bah!)

Umsatzsteuer-Karussell

“Value-added tax carousel.” On 12 Dec 2012 there was a razzia at the Deutsche Bank in which 500 finance police searched its offices and employees’ apartments in several cities for evidence of German Umsatzsteuer tax fraud for CO2 pollution permits sold abroad. Again, the scheme seems to have been to pass the paper back and forth across borders until it was unclear whether the tax due in Germany had been paid, after which the bank printed receipts saying it had and asked the German I.R.S. to refund, in this case, the 19% V.A.T. for the supposedly foreign transaction. Süddeutsche Zeitung described it as the government’s advance payment of V.A.T. to dummy companies that never paid it back and then evaporated. Trade in CO2 pollution permits shot up between 2008 and 2010, and the German fiscus refunded billions of euros to such schemes, according to the Bundeskriminalamt.

The Frankfurt general district attorney, who has been investigating this since 2010, voiced concern that Deutsche Bank employees, among other things, did not report suspected money laundering as they were required to. Germany’s largest bank, DeuBa garnered at least 230 million euros via the scheme.

The first razzia looking for evidence in this carbon emissions trading carousel scheme was carried out in April 2010 (and an unknown person warned the bank the day before). In December 2011 a decision by the Frankfurt District Court [Landgericht] listed instances in which the Deutsche Bank apparently did not care to ask questions about its business partners. Journalist Klaus Ott described some of them in an article in the Süddeutsche Zeitung dated 30 April 2012: “A business account for a furniture store that wants to engage in emissions trading? A business account for a company that doesn’t have any offices yet? A C.E.O. who doesn’t speak German but signs German-language bank papers with no prior translation? No problem! And what about the risk management documents of the company bringing in the new partner? The bank isn’t interested, even though it is well known that something stinks in this industry.” Spiegel-Online reported that in one case a ten-minute conversation sufficed to set up this million-euro deal. People behind the scheme appear to have been located in London.

Update on 20 Dec 2013: Europe’s carbon emissions market is merely ~100 billion euros, Süddeutsche.de wrote, but the continent’s “more vulnerable” “scarcely monitored”  electricity and gas market is about nine times as large. It looks like the carousel tax scheme has been used there too, by Germany’s third-largest utility company EnBW but they’re not the only ones. Europol said that “criminals” used the carousel to avoid ~5 billion euros in value-added taxes in the carbon emissions market, but that the tax fraud may have been correspondingly higher in the bigger market.

The alleged electricity trading carousel was set up quickly, growing very large very fast. At EnBW, for example, tax auditors either found or made an in-house note that in 2011 “tax-free sales increased from circa one billion euros to ten billion euros within one year.” Germany’s F.B.I., the Bundeskriminalamt, was quoted as saying setting up the scheme required specialist expertise and in fact looked rather “organized.”

Süddeutsche.de indicated they learned these details from internal confidential papers from e.g. tax auditors in Karlsruhe and a central corporate I.R.S.-type office in Stuttgart [Zentrales Konzernprüfungsamt Stuttgart]. Europol, German prosecutors from multiple cities and German tax officials from multiple states are said to be investigating.

(OOM zots SHTOY err   car OO! sell.)

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