Mehrparteiensystem

“Multiple party system,” what Iranian president Hassan Rouhani has called for to replace the country’s current single-party political system, according to Iran’s official press agency I.R.N.A. “Until now, Iran has only had fractions and political wings,” said ZDF heute journal.

(MAYOR pah TIE en zissed AIM.)

Sittenpolizei

“Morals police.”

For over thirty years, professional and amateur morals police in Iran have beaten women who appeared outside the home in clothing the morals police felt was inappropriate.

Now, new president Rouhani has said, women will no longer be arrested for appearing unveiled in public.

“Good manners [Sittsamkeit] is more than just wearing the hijab. The way the guardians understand modesty awakens contradictions in our society. It has negative consequences, contradicts the teachings of Islam and is unconstitutional.” —Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

Iran’s chief of police, General Ismail Ahmadi-Moghaddam, “confirmed that women’s clothing will no longer be a law enforcement matter,” Süddeutsche.de reported, adding that the general was concerned about the bad reputation Iran’s police had accrued from this since 26 organizations had been tasked with the “Gaschte Erschad project,” he said, with millions budgeted for their work.

Update on 22 Nov 2013: A leader in the dreaded Basij militias, Sardar Naghdi, said at Friday prayers at the University of Teheran, where hardcore defenders of the 1979 Revolution governments have been meeting, that Facebook, YouTube and Google are instruments the U.S. has been using to subjugate Iran. He said this because President Rouhani’s government was considering allowing internet-based social networks in the country again.

(ZITT en pole eats eye.)

Dann doch!

“Well, okay then.” Actually, this is yet another thrilled German headline about the warming of diplomatic relations between Iran and the U.S.A. The wonderful détente is very exciting. Hopefully, now, we can all get rich together, a wish expressed by my Iranian kitchenmates at German university ten years ago.

A recently published “history of Iran for beginners” said the country had ~38 auto manufacturing companies, presumably in response to international sanctions. Perhaps innovators like Google or Tesla could work out deals with some of these groups to supply novel parts for renewable-energy car projects. There could now be excellent internationally sponsored engineering programs at Iranian universities, and training exchanges around the world.

(Don DOCK.)

 

Salzgemahlte Metallfarben

“Salt-ground metal paints,” a technique used by sixteenth-century Mughal artists, who learned their craft from Persian painters, to create gold, silver and copper paints by first pounding the metal flat between layers of leather and then grinding the foil with coarse salt in a mortar. The salt was removed by rinsing with water, leaving behind metal powder.

(ZOLTS geh MOLT eh   met OLL fah ben.)

Reiseberichte, Reisebeschreibungen

“Travel reports,” “travel descriptions.” Travelogues, books and stories that share a wanderer’s experiences, discoveries, places and times.

From a recent travel article in Spiegel-Online:

“Iran has sensational sights to go and see. The monuments to the poets, the gardens in Shiraz, the oasis idylls of Yazd, the mosques in Isfahan, all were on my itinerary. But then I kept meeting so many wonderful people, whose stories were much more interesting than those narrated by historic stone walls.”

(WRY zeh beh RICK teh,   WRY zeh beh SHRY boong en.)

Schellackraritäten

“Shellack rarities,” rare old records. Hildesheim University is working with Teheran’s Music Museum of Iran to digitize thousands of old Iranian records, preserving them, cleaning up the recordings and making it possible to share them on a large scale. The first recording devices were brought to Iran by caravan about 100 years ago through Istanbul, reports the F.A.Z.

Hildesheim Uni’s Center for World Music has done this before. They worked with Germany’s Foreign Office to collect old records of popular music from markets in Ghana, Malawi and Sierra Leone, saving them and digitizing them. Now African radio stations can play their countries’ old music.

(Shell OCK rawr ee TATE en.)

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