Untreue wegen mangelndes Risikomanagement

Breach of trust due to inadequate risk management.

The entire former management board of northern German bank HSH Nordbank is on trial in Hamburg for approving a deal in 2007 allegedly without sufficiently informing themselves first (“bullwhipping it through in only three days right before Christmas” on the basis of a memo that did not contain the data required by due diligence, so the prosecutors). This is the first time an entire bank board has been put on trial in Germany, but it presumably won’t be the last.

In 2007, to avoid receiving a lower rating from the Wall Street ratings agencies one year before the bank’s scheduled stock market launch, prosecutors said, HSH Nordbank moved a collateralized debt obligation package that included risky real estate and commodities paper “away” into an entity called Omega 55, for which the French bank BNP Paribas guaranteed. In return, HSH guaranteed when BNP Paribas moved risky paper, valued at 2.4 billion euros and including Iceland government bonds from Lehman Brothers, into the Omega 55 entity [Zweckgesellschaft, “special-purpose vehicle” according to Bloomberg.com]. HSH’s guarantees for BNP Paribas securities ended up costing HSH >150 million euros in 2008; ultimately in the course of the global financial crisis the bank had to be bailed out by 30 billion euros that included taxpayer money from its majority owners, the German states of Schleswig-Holstein and Hamburg, and taxpayer money from the German bank bailout funds BaFin and SoFFin. Omega 55’s losses were in part kept off the bank’s books, which is why two of the six former HSH board members are further going to be tried for balance sheet falsification [Bilanzfälschung, “false accounting” according to Bloomberg.com]. Guilty verdicts in the breach of trust trial could also result in a civil lawsuit from HSH against its former managers.

Update on 23 Jul 2013: Bloomberg.com reported that charges were also brought against managers from Bayerische Landesbank (BayernLB), Sachsen LB and Landesbank Baden-Württemberg, but these cases have not yet gone to trial.

Update on 16 Dec 2013: HSH Nordbank has been accused of dividend stripping.

Update on 28 May 2014: Hamburg prosecutors are asking for probation and fines of up to 150,000 euros, after they reduced their estimate of damage done to the bank from ~150 million euros to ˜50 million. This is in the breach of trust trial, for signing off on what was a “circular transaction” in 2007, without questioning inconsistencies in the information presented to them.

Update on 09 Jul 2014: The entire former management board of HSH Nordbank was found innocent. Dubious deeds and dereliction of duty, said the judge from the Economic Crimes Court [Wirtschaftsstrafkammer], but he didn’t think there was enough evidence to prove serious dereliction of duty. Also there’s no evidence that the HSH Nordbankers profited financially from the damage they caused. Trials against managers from IKB and the Baden-Württemberg Landesbank for their risk management before the global financial crisis have also been canceled, said Spiegel.de. At the time, what those bankers did was neither illegal nor unusual.

The states of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein had to pump 13 billion euros into HSH Nordbank to bail it out.

Update on 10 Jul 2014: The judge gave the prosecutors the option of appealing this decision, and they will appeal it to the supreme court in Karlsruhe.

(OON troy ah   vague en   MON geln dess   REESE ee co men edge ment.)

Dividendenstripping

Dividend stripping.” A tax avoidance scheme the HypoVereinsBank is accused of, wherein they allegedly transferred customers’ stocks back and forth between German and foreign banks until it was unclear whether the Kapitalertragssteuer had been paid and then claimed more capital gains tax credits than were owed. Reuters and the Süddeutsche Zeitung reported that a single Frankfurt investor working with HVB and other banks was told he owed 124 million euros in tax for 2006–08 after the IRS-equivalent refused to accept his capital gains tax break from the scheme; he has been fighting in court since 2011 to get HVB to pay the tax bill. HVB and this investor split the profits 65% HVB, 35% investor. Wikipedia says dividend stripping lost its tax-law basis in 2000, Spiegel says it hasn’t been accepted by German tax authorities since 2007, and Süddeutsche Zeitung says since 2012.

Weird story about the HypoVereinsBank in Spiegel-Online on 30 Nov 2012: A guy accused his ex-wife and other HVB employees of large-scale tax avoidance schemes that moved money to Switzerland, was declared non compos mentis by the Bavarian justice system and has been locked up in a mental institution ever since (2006). The man probably was violent, but he may have been correct about the tax avoidance. He cited names and numbers when he blew the whistle to the Bavarian tax authority, but a judge who was not involved in that case called the tax office and told them not to investigate the bank because the whistleblower was crazy. The institutionalized whistleblower’s case was re-opened in 2013. He was set free  in the summer of 2013, after seven years of confinement. Laws committing people to mental institutions and keeping them there are going to be reformed as a result of his case. This started with an 05 Sep 2013 decision by the supreme court in Karlsruhe, the Bundesverfassungsgericht, which prioritized a review of the whistleblower’s case and announced failures of the various state courts and criteria that need to be met in future.

The Frankfurt district attorney’s HVB razzia last week found a trail leading to “a Swiss private bank.” Süddeutsche Zeitung says it is thought that Swiss banks will be a very fruitful place to investigate this German tax scandal. Deutsche Bank and UBS are now implicated as well.

Update on 16 Dec 2013: HSH Nordbank has been accused of dividend stripping.

(Dee veed END en shtrrrip pink.)

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