Sittenpolizei

“Morals police.”

For over thirty years, professional and amateur morals police in Iran have beaten women who appeared outside the home in clothing the morals police felt was inappropriate.

Now, new president Rouhani has said, women will no longer be arrested for appearing unveiled in public.

“Good manners [Sittsamkeit] is more than just wearing the hijab. The way the guardians understand modesty awakens contradictions in our society. It has negative consequences, contradicts the teachings of Islam and is unconstitutional.” —Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

Iran’s chief of police, General Ismail Ahmadi-Moghaddam, “confirmed that women’s clothing will no longer be a law enforcement matter,” Süddeutsche.de reported, adding that the general was concerned about the bad reputation Iran’s police had accrued from this since 26 organizations had been tasked with the “Gaschte Erschad project,” he said, with millions budgeted for their work.

Update on 22 Nov 2013: A leader in the dreaded Basij militias, Sardar Naghdi, said at Friday prayers at the University of Teheran, where hardcore defenders of the 1979 Revolution governments have been meeting, that Facebook, YouTube and Google are instruments the U.S. has been using to subjugate Iran. He said this because President Rouhani’s government was considering allowing internet-based social networks in the country again.

(ZITT en pole eats eye.)

Schlichtungsstelle für Flugreisende

“Arbitration board for air passengers.” Created on 03 May 2013 by the Bundesrat to support consumers traveling by air. Starting November 2013, passengers in Germany can contact this office to seek information about passenger rights and financial remuneration from airports and airlines after e.g. delayed connections, missed connections and/or lost luggage. What airlines owe passengers after which screwups is also being defined in regulations.

Update on 01 Nov 2013: German air passengers can now contact the Schlichtungsstelle für den öffentlichen Personenverkehr [German Conciliation Body for Public Transport] to start arbitration proceedings in disputes with airlines. German rail, bus and ship passengers already had this right from that office. Costs for the proceedings will be paid by German transport companies; passengers requiring arbitration in a transport dispute will only have to pay their own costs.

The söp’s charming and helpful English page stated,

“A traveller can get help with a complaint about delays and missed connections, train and plane cancellations, damaged or lost luggage, faulty information, tickets and reservations, and/or bad service. The main task of the söp is the out-of-court settlement of individual disputes between travellers and the transport companies. Within this, söp also helps to strengthen the customer satisfaction with the transport company. […]”

“The söp follows a service and practical approach, as intermodal (‘verkehrsträgerübergreifende’) settlement scheme. It is common for travellers to use more than one form of transport (e.g., train to plane), which can take up a lot of time in a dispute by investigating the whole chain of transport, including the responsible contracted partners. With the söp the consumer does not have to deal with the question of responsibility and can, independent from the transport of choice, just deal with one contact person at söp (one-face-to-the-customer-approach).”

(SCHLICHH toongz shtell ah   foor   FLOOG rye zen dah.)

Fluggastrechteverordnung

“Air passenger rights regulation,” the EU’s Passenger Compensation Regulation. A recent European Court of Justice decision narrowed their definition of force majeure exceptions to airlines’ responsibilities for stranded passengers in the European Union.

(FLEW ghast WRECKED eh fair ORD noong.)

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