Kaskade von Haftung

“Cascade of responsibility.” New package of banking rules agreed by the European finance ministers on 27 Jun 2013 defining an order of responsibility for saving failed banks: first the banks’ shareholders will pay/lose money. Next, people who loaned the banks money to make loans will pay. Then, owners of large accounts >100,000 euros will pay. Last, the taxpayers will pay. Savings accounts <100,000 euros at failed banks are guaranteed to be refunded, if need be by taxpayers.

CNN.com reported that a hierarchy was also defined among large depositors, with big businesses being asked to pay before small and medium-sized businesses.

Details the day after the announcement: Under the new rules, being called a “bail-in regime,” when a bank is unable to meet its financial obligations, 8% of its debt will be paid by the bank’s shareholders, creditors/bondholders and large depositors. The next 5% will be paid by country bank funds (that will have to be set up). If that’s still not enough, the country will have to decide what to do.

The Guardian.co.uk reported that the second layer, country bank funds, responsible for rescuing 5% of failed banks must “come from a resolution fund which has to be built up over 10 years and cover 0.8% of the insured deposits in any given country.” The UK got excused from having to create or at least fund that fund because they said they wanted to collect a “bank levy” instead, for what sounds like an FDIC-type scheme in which banks (help) pay for failed banks. CNN.com reported that the resolution funds would also contain mandatory bank contributions, however.

(Coss CAW deh   fon   HAWF toong.)

Blaupause

To this foreigner, Blaupause looks like “blue break,” which might indicate a nice use of free time in a well-situated beer garden because “blue” means drinking in Germany. But the word actually means “blueprints.”

New ESM head Jeroen Dijsselbloem angered some small countries whose economies are dependent on a large banking sector or at least threatened by large bank failures when he indicated that elements found to work in what the EU does in Cyprus—reduction of a banking sector that had grown to 7x the size of the country’s economy, reregulation of the remaining banks—could be applied to other Member States that get in too much trouble.

About Cyprus: German news reports that, during the past fortnight of negotiations when large transfers from Cypriot banks were supposed to be frozen, over a billion euros were nevertheless transferred off the island by foreign banks, mostly in London. A whistleblower list has appeared containing names of parliament members, local officials and associated companies and organizations that received millions in loans between 2007 and 2012 from the country’s two largest banks (Bank of Cyprus and Laiki Bank, plus Hellenic Bank in only one instance so far) but did not have to pay the full loans back. The only Cypriot political parties not represented on that list were a social democratic party and an environmental party, fwiw. A second whistleblower list is expected to appear containing names of large deposit holders who managed to get their money off the island just in time.

The corruption details cited in the Spiegel article were reported by the Cyprus news portal 24h.com.cy, Greek journalist Kostas Vaxevanis, and the Greek newspapers Ethnos and Kathimerini.

(Bl ow! Pow! Zah.)

Systemrelevante Banken

System-relevant banks, that are “too big to fail,” otherwise known as GSifi (global systemically important financial institutions). The head of the USA’s FDIC and a hohes Tier from the Bank of England published a proposal in the Financial Times on 10 Dec 2012 for reregulating system-relevant banks and making them less of a global economic risk. Under this proposal, if these huge banks got in trouble their top managers would be able to be fired by the responsible regulatory authorities, their shareholders would lose part or all of their investment, their creditors would not be able to collect all their unsecured debt, and rules would be applied to the company/ies at the top level of the holding hierarchy rather than the shuffle of subsidiaries. To promote national financial stability, healthy subsidiaries around the world would be preserved even if the top-level holding company is wound down. There are currently said to be 28 system-relevant banks in the world, of which 12 are in the UK and USA.

(Cis TEHM rellll ev ont eh   BONK en.)

Finanzmarktstabilisierungsanstalt, FMSA

“Financial market stabilization institution.” From the SoFFin acronym, which stands for Sonderfonds Finanzmarktstabilisierung Finanzmarktstabilisierungsanstalt. SoFFin was founded in 2008 to stabilize struggling banks.

Update on 16 Jul 2013: Between 01 Jan and 30 Jun 2013, the German taxpayer-supported SoFFin fund paid out ~18 billion euros in aid, ~17 billion being in the form of Eigenkapitalhilfe [equity assistance? does this translation apply for banks?], which, ZDF heute journal reported, Hypo Real Estate benefitted most from, followed by Commerzbank and WestLB successor Portigon.

(Fee NONTS mark t shtah beel ee zeer oongs ON shtoll t.)

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