Schwachstellen in Sicherheitsprodukte einbauen

“Building in vulnerabilities in security products,” one of several methods the N.S.A. and G.C.H.Q. used to unlock encryption methods previously thought secure, according to the Guardian.co.uk, NYTimes.com and ProPublica.org. When the Canadian company BlackBerry updated its encryption in 2009, for example, the N.S.A. cracked it in mere months, according to a Spiegel.de article headlined “Champagne!

These two large agencies and their partners in e.g. the Five Eyes alliance have also been benefiting from encryption cracking via supercomputers, targeted hacking committees, strange U.S. letters and court orders that forbid the ordered from ever mentioning the order, an N.S.A. Computer Solutions Center that “provided security testing” for tech products, subversion of international security standards used by developers but especially persuasion of tech companies, whose names remain most secret.

Tagesschau.de reported on 06 Sep 2013 that the “Bankenverband“—the name indicates an association of banks but the reporter did not define it more specifically—announced that N.S.A. employees and contractors can only view Germans’ online banking but cannot transfer money out of (“plunder”) their accounts. German consumers will not be reassured by this.

Brazil’s TV Globo on 08 Sep 2013 added to the list of snooped targets the international S.W.I.F.T. bank transfer network, the closed computer networks of “airlines, foreign governments, power companies and financial institutions” and the state-owned Brazilian oil company Petrobras, increasing fears of industrial espionage by the U.S.A. and its allies.

The Guardian.co.uk article on the targeted placement of back doors into encryption software was very angry about how vulnerable to criminals this makes everyone (called “the consumer and other adversaries” in one Snowden trove document). Weakening software causes people to commit crimes who wouldn’t normally have done so.

(Sh VOCHH shtell en   in   ZICHH ah heights prod OOK teh   EYE n bough en.)

Verschlüsselungspflicht für Telekom-Unternehmen

“Mandatory encryption for telecom companies,” one solution proposed by the opposition to Angela Merkel’s coalition in the wake of Edward Snowden’s surveillance revelations. Another solution, discussed by the ruling coalition, was supposedly transferring responsibility for saving searchable copies of all communications from public-sector government agencies to private-sector phone companies.

Update on 02 Sep 2013: NYTimes.com reporting and others’ follow-ups appear to indicate that the company AT&T has been keeping its own copies of phone communications, more than just “metadata,” and people have used it to access 26-year-old phone calls. AT&T employees could be hired to help government agents search their difficult database.

Update dated 4 July 2013: Holland’s Data Protection Authority issued a report on their investigation into mobile network packet inspection by KPN, Tele2, T-Mobile and Vodafone, finding that the companies illegally saved individual customers’ online data, such as websites visited and apps used. The data was furthermore saved in a “detailed” manner.

(Fer SHLÜSS ell oongs flichh t   foor   TAY lay kom oon ter NAY men.)

Buchstabensalat

“Alphabet salad.” What investigators will supposedly find if they tap the now-encrypted uploads to Kim Dotcom’s new venture.

(BOO! chh SHTOB en zah LAHT.)

Blog at WordPress.com.