Buddelschiffbauer

People who build tiny ship models inside glass bottles.

A small Baltic sea town has a museum of these tiny model masterpieces: the Buddelschiffmuseum in Boltenhagen. There are other Buddelschiff museums in Holland and northern Germany, according to a list kindly provided by der Spiegel.

At the Boltenhagen museum, kids can help put the ships in the bottles.

There is also a Verein of bottle ship builders: the Deutsche Buddelschiffer Gilde e.V. New members are very welcome.

Spiegel said Hans Euler was the hardest-working Buddelschiff builder of all time. “He put 16,517 ships into glass according to the Guinness Book of World Records.” For a model of a famous 18th-century sea battle, “Euler forced an entire armada through the narrow neck of a 50-liter wine fermenter.”

After Hans Euler died in 2001, the most famous Buddelschiff builder was Jonny Reinert from Herne in the Ruhrgebiet. Jonny started bottling ships late in life, after working as a coal miner. His best-known work was a whale hunt in a 129-liter bottle.

The oldest bottled model ship found so far was made in 1725 and is on display in a museum in Lübeck.

(BOODLE shiff BOWER.)

Schönschreiber

Beautifully writing writers.

In its report on the 30th anniversary of the first German email—which arrived after 24 hours in transit at the university of Karlsruhe—ZDF heute journal showed four old-fashioned Schönschreiber at work. Their job is to write messages in beautiful handwriting. Of course their pens were adequate. Their manufactory also had quite an arsenal of papers. Some of the professional handwriters worked in fingerless white cotton gloves.

(SHIN shribe ah.)

“Der Letzte seines Standes”

“The Last of Their Guild,” an excellent show by the Bavarian Broadcasting Channel (BR). Just as the future is here, but not evenly distributed, so is the past still here in surprising ways. The few episodes I saw captured craftsmanship traditions, obsolete and obsolescing technology, old things being preserved by traditions, old things being preserved by new purposes being found for them and giving them new usefulness, and surviving traces of central Europe’s medieval self-limiting labor organizations. By interviewing the people and filming their workshops and methods, they showed viewers the nuts and bolts of a thrilling variety of old jobs, including barrel makers, wheelwrights, and of course the great one about the guy who still braids buggy whips.

Episodes may include working windmills and water wheels.

(Dare   LET stah   z eye n ess   SHTOND ess.)

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