Gehaltszulage, Taschengeld, Spesen

“Extra salary,”

“pocket money,”

and the German word that, depending on how loosely your company defines it, may mean money for expenses, room and board, sundries, fees, entertainment. “Ausser Spesen nichts gewesen” (ow! sah   SHPAY zen   nix    geh VEY zen) means a sales trip occurred in which few positive results were achieved apart from enjoying the per diem for expenses.

After the E.U. capped bankers’ bonuses at 1x to 2x annual salary, London banks have started renaming their lagniappes in ways that don’t easily translate into German. Last fall some of the bonus lolly was being paid as “top up” money, and now they’re being called “allowances.”

NYTimes.com said new nomenclature may also include “role-based pay” and “reviewable salary.”

Gray areas are being found, NYTimes.com said, between fixed pay and variable pay. The new bonuses can include giving employees variable pay at fixed, regular time intervals, not having it count toward a pension, resetting it every year like a salary, changing it in response to environmental factors like a bonus.

Renaming bonuses may make it harder to “claw” them back after risk management mistakes, as well as impede efforts to encourage employees to take a longer-term view by e.g. requiring bonuses to be paid out in installments over several years.

(G’HALT soo log en,   TOSH en geld,   SHPAY zen.)

Bankenberatung bemängeln

German consumer protection groups “criticized the deficiencies in investment advice banks give to consumers,” saying the old issue persists that bank advisors’ recommendations depend more on the commission the advisor will earn from the investment than the return the customer will reap, the risk they will be exposed to, whether they can afford the product, and/or possibly also the harm propagated by the company invested in.

ZDF heute journal’s financial correspondent Valerie Haller said consumer protection groups such as the Verbraucherzentrale Baden-Württemberg warned that better and qualified bank advising would only happen if investment advisory services and investment sales were separated within the banks. Bank investment advisors ought to have specialist qualification (usually this means courses and a test) and the quality of their advice ought to be monitored by government with sanctions applicable after violations. These systemic changes need to be made via new legislation from the Bundestag, a consumer protection rep said.

Ms. Haller added that the banks countered by claiming ~90% of their customers said they were satisfied with the investments they’d been advised to make, to which the consumer protection groups responded that they had evidence many customers didn’t understand what they’d bought.

Apparently bank advisor’s commissions have been banned by law in the U.K., though either this was done recently or it was incomplete because a new fine was just imposed on Lloyds Banking Group for two billion pounds’ worth of bonus-fueled overselling from 2010 to 2012. The listed “products” oversold to the possibly up to 700,000 customers do not include stocks and bonds, and the Guardian quoted the U.K.’s Financial Conduct Authority’s director of enforcement and financial crime as saying customers will not be “‘put first'” while companies still “‘incentivise their staff to do the opposite.'” The Guardian said she mentioned that “the fine had been increased by 10% because Lloyds failed to heed repeated warnings about sales practices and because it had been fined 10 years ago for poor sales incentives.”

The Baden-Württemberg consumer protection group’s webpage reminds readers that Germany’s statute of limitations period for suing banks after incorrect investment advice was recently lengthened from three to ten years. Also that bank investment advisors have been required by law since 2010 to keep a record describing what was said in their meetings with clients and potential clients when discussing potential purchases of stocks or bonds [Wertpapiere]; this does not apply for consultations about other products, such as the ones Lloyds was just fined for overselling. After a consultation, German bank advisors must sign a copy of the protocol and give it to the consultee, who does not have to sign it even though some banks have claimed the opposite. The German law mostly lets the banks decide how the protocol will look but does define the following general requirements:

1. Reason for the consultation

2. Length of consultation

3. Advice-relevant information about the customer’s personal situation

4. Data about the financial instruments and investment services discussed

5. The customer’s wishes and investment goals, and their relevant weightings

6. Advisor’s product recommendations and reasons why

(BONK en bear AH toong   bem ENG elln.)

Das neue Bankenpaket

The new package of bank regulations passed by the EU on 16 Apr 2013. It applies to all banks and is intended to strengthen their situation so they can’t bring down any more world economies. 1) Banks must set aside a higher percentage of reserve capital, a bigger “capital buffer,” to save them in times of crisis; 2) starting 2015 their total debt will be limited; 3) an upper limit was set for banker bonuses (max. 2x the annual salary).

(Doss   NOY ah   BONK en pock ate.)

 

Abzockerei

“Ripoffery,” word used in an exciting Swiss voters’ referendum to limit bonuses, and not just in banks! In Switzerland. The election is Sunday, 3 Mar 2013. Proponents of the referendum want performance-based salaries and for executives’ compensation to have to be approved by shareholders, the actual owners of the companies concerned. Pro-referendum posters say things like “Compensation excesses harm pension funds + Swiss old-age and survivors insurance + the people’s economy.”

(Ob TSOCK err eye.)

BaFin

German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority,” which announced that it will be checking the bonuses paid by banks in Germany. “We think it’s important to verify whether banks are in fact complying with the laws’ requirements. Because checking bonuses and salaries is an important instrument for countering undesirable developments in the banking system.” The ruling coalition welcomes this because the announcement itself should cause better compliance with existing banking regulations. The SPD, which is in the opposition, says it’s not enough and that in this election year they will fight for stricter new laws and for radical limits to be set for banker remuneration.

(Baffin.)

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