Freiheitsrechte

Germans are world-famous for being protective of personal privacy. Their constitutionally protected civil liberties are slightly different as well; here are the basic Freiheitsrechte, or “personal liberty rights,” according to de.Wikipedia:

Allgemeine Handlungsfreiheit: “General freedom of action” Art. 2 of the German Constitution [Grundgesetz, GG]. Art. 2 No. 1 appears to be the basis for what are known as the “Persönlichkeitsrechte,” “personality rights” protecting the “free unfolding” of the personality against interventions in a person’s life and freedom, even after death.

Recht auf Leben: “Right to life” Art. 2 No. 2 GG

Recht auf Freiheit: “Right to freedom” Art. 2 No. 2 GG

Recht auf körperliche Unversehrtheit: “Right to bodily integrity” Art. 2 No. 2 GG

Gewissensfreiheit: “Freedom of conscience” Art. 4 No. 1 GG

Religionsfreiheit: “Freedom of religion” Art. 4 No. 2 GG

Meinungsfreiheit: “Freedom of opinion” Art. 5 No. 1 GG

Versammlungsfreiheit: “Right to assemble” Art. 8 No. 1 GG

Vereinigungsfreiheit: “Freedom of association” Art. 9 No. 1 GG

Koalitionsfreiheit: “Freedom of coalition,” for employees and employers to form groups to promote their interests. Art. 9 No. 3 GG

Freizügigkeit: “Right of abode” to choose where you will live. Art. 11 No. 1 GG

Berufsfreiheit: “Freedom of profession” to choose your own jobs and the training for them. Art. 12 No. 1 GG

(FRYE heights rect eh.)

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